ANNE RAYMOND

Raymond’s oil paintings are luminous layers of rich color, full of nuance and surprise, changing with the light or the viewer’s vantage point.
— Coco Myers

“I'm interested in the evocative power of inferred space and energy beyond the edges of the canvas. Glazes of translucent color and expressive drawing speak of nature and the transitory quality of changing light. Sky, water and motion are recurring themes of inspiration.

I begin by adding and subtracting pigment as an etcher wipes a plate, always working light to dark. The result is a composition of luminous layers of translucent color, with spontaneous drawing introduced throughout the process. I seek to balance the energy of drawing and the serenity of open space. My goal as an artist is to create powerful images that invite the viewer to move away from certainty and experience something new… even years after the first encounter.” — AR


Anne Raymond was born in Washington, D.C., and grew up in Dallas, Texas. A graduate of the University of Texas, she went on to study at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

Raymond’s paintings and monotypes have been featured in group exhibitions in galleries and cultural centers throughout the United States, including the Sears Peyton Gallery and Robert Steele Gallery in New York City; the Peter Bartlow Gallery in Chicago; the Butters Gallery in Portland, OR; the Gail Harvey Gallery in Santa Monica; Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art, Sarasota, FL; and the Lizan-Tops Gallery, East Hampton, NY, among others.

Raymond’s work is also in the permanent collections of major museums including The Boston Museum of Fine Arts and The Blanton Museum of Art at The University of Texas at Austin, as well as in numerous private and corporate collections. She maintains a studio in East Hampton, NY.


Raymond in her studio

Raymond in her studio

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


ANNE RAYMOND speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

AR/ With both my oil paintings and my monotypes I’m interested in combining subtle glazes with dramatic drawing. I make many of my tools… and I am still learning to stop working on a piece before the freshness escapes.

CM/ DOES LIVING ON THE EAST END INFLUENCE YOUR SUBJECT?

AR/ Yes. The sea, bay, sky and evergreen forest are ever present influences. The translucent light is majestic. Every season has its unique character.

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END?

AR/ The abstract expressionist movement was of interest to me before studying art in college. And I bought a home in East Hampton with a large studio in 1994.

CM/ ARE THERE ANY PARTICULAR EAST END ARTISTS LIVING YOU’D LOVE TO LIVE WITH?

AR/ I would love to have a Joan Mitchell and a de Kooning from the late 50s and early 60s.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

DAVID RUFO

Rufo’s optical paintings—in precisely executed patterns of color and shape—have an electric, kinetic energy.
— Coco Myers

“My work is informed by the hyper-kinetic shifts of the Op Art movement and viscous psychedelic imagery that permeated the visual landscape of my childhood in the sixties and seventies.

Parabolic spiral dot patterns are meticulously painted on an amorphous color field where vivid hues with intricate concentric elements dominate the compositions. I also make use of items such as frisket film, commercial stencils, and flat washers to create a variety of masking effects. This added layer generates a perceptual dissonance brought on by a narrow depth of field and shapes that seemingly float on the surface, when in actuality, they are brought about by unpainted portions of the background paper or canvas.

I am interested in making a body of work that appears cool and detached, but upon closer inspection is revealed to be imperfect, vulnerable, and wholly human.” — D


David Rufo was born and raised in upstate New York. He graduated from Syracuse University, where he holds a Ph.D. in Teaching and Curriculum with a specialization in Art Education. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Fordham University and produces his art in New York City, Amagansett, and upstate New York.

Rufo’s work has appeared in group shows at the Pamela Willliams Gallery, Amagansett, NY; folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Geras Tousignant Gallery, Palm Springs, CA; Soho House, New York, NY; Studio 10 Gallery, NOMENColorATURE, Brooklyn, NY; Smith Hall Gallery, Syracuse University, NY; and Cazenovia Art Gallery, New York, NY, among other galleries. His solo exhibitions include shows at Solomon Art Gallery, New York, NY; Robert J. Spring Gallery, New York, NY; 12 Rooms Gallery, Syracuse, NY; and Alldays Gallery, Bennington, VT. His work is included in several collections, in the U.S. and abroad.


The Comfit Maker, 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 40 in

The Comfit Maker, 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 40 in

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


DAVID RUFO speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ HOW DO YOU START ONE OF YOUR PAINTINGS?

DR/ 1. Pour a glass of wine. 2. Choose masking material (this year it has been coins, washers, or masking fluid). 3. Airbrush background. 4. Superimpose drawings using a compass and various templates. 5. Add dots in a parabolic pattern. 6. Fill in colors creating a mandala-like structure while listening to NPR and art podcasts. 7. Take dog outside 8. Bring dog back in. 9. Pour final glass of wine. 10. Take photo of work in progress and post to FaceBook and Instagram. 11. Fall to sleep while visualizing next steps.

CM/ HOW DOES PROXIMITY TO WATER INFLUENCE YOUR WORK?

DR/ During morning walks on the beach I love to examine the rhomboid patterns etched in the sand after the swash.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK? IN A STUDIO SPACE? OUTSIDE?

DR/ I paint every night after dinner; this happens in a variety of locations. When at home, I set up my work on the table after dinner. When in the city, I work in my office at Fordham's Lincoln Center campus, or at the Library Hotel in midtown Manhattan. Also, we are building a house on twelve acres in upstate New York. I expect to begin incorporating the outside spaces into my art making process as well. 

CM/ DO YOU FEEL INSPIRED BY THE ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT ON THE EAST END?

DR/ Yes—de Kooning. Especially his color palette from the mid-1980s. At that time I was living in Hell's Kitchen and working as a bouncer at nightclubs around the city such as Limelight, Palladium, China Club, and the Ritz. I recall seeing de Kooning’s work from that time period and feeling that it aptly reflected both the contemporary and historic trends of the Western Art canon. 
.

CM/ Do you have any works by East End artists in your home?

DR/ A signed copy of Ross Bleckner's book, My Life in the New York Times. During a studio visit I asked if he would dip his brush into a pot of silver-black paint to sign the book, which he graciously did. I am also fortunate to have a gorgeous small oil by Mark Perry that I obtained after a visit to his stunning east end home and studio.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

BASTIENNE SCHMIDT

Schmidt mines the art of geometry and plumbs the world of shapes and hues. Her intellect and creativity come through in every piece.
— Coco Myers

“Through photography, painting and drawing, I explore concepts of identity and place. Photography and art fall into the realm of archeology—searching for layers of history and meaning, and re-assigning value to them. I spent my childhood surrounded by my father’s archeological work, which instilled in me a desire to organize, map, and attempt to understand systems through artwork. My large scale drawings and paintings can be seen as mind maps made up of juxtaposed pieces of cultural influences.

I use an artistic process that often consists of layering thin transparent paper upon which I paint and draw. Paper offers an intuitive medium that allows for overlapping and for organic coming together of spaces.

Geometric forms, such as circles, triangles and squares, play a large role in my work and the use of a multifold of blues goes back to my childhood, growing up on the Greek island of Samos. For my paintings and drawings I have created a personal topography that draws inspiration from travels as far as Egypt and Burma and from observing details close to home: a coffee stain, for instance, can be seen as a stain, a map or a topography.” — BS


Bastienne Schmidt was born in Munich, Germany, and was raised in Greece and Italy. She studied anthropology at the University Ludwig-Maximilian Universitaet in Munich, Germany and graduated with a degree of Fine Arts from the University Accademia di Belli Arti, Perugia, Italy. She spent 10 years in New York, where she maintains a studio, before moving full time to Bridgehampton.

Schmidt’s work has been shown in over 100 exhibitions worldwide, including the New Museum, New York City; the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York; the Zimmerli Museum, New Brunswick, NJ; Museum fuer Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, Germany; Musee de la Photographie, Charleroi, Belgium; Musee de Elysee, Lausanne, Switzerland; Ricco/Maresca Gallery and Throckmorton Gallery, New York City; Parrish Road Show, Sag Harbor, NY; Harpers Books and folioeast, East Hampton, NY; the Houston Center for Photography, Houston, TX; Ille Arts, Amagansett, NY; Hamilton Gallery, London, England; Gallery Argus, Berlin, Germany.

Six monographs of her works have been published, among them Vivir la Muerte, American Dreams, Shadowhome, Home Stills, Topography of Quiet and Typology of Women.

Her work is also included in many collections: the Museum of Modern Art and the International Center of Photography in New York City; the Brooklyn Museum in Brooklyn NY; the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, DC; the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, TX; the Center for Creative Photography in Tuscon, AZ; Guild Hall in East Hampton, NY; the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, TX; the Victoria and Albert Museum in London; and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris, among others.


Blue Geometry 5, 2019, mixed media on paper, 16 x 20 in

Blue Geometry 5, 2019, mixed media on paper, 16 x 20 in

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


BASTIENNE SCHMIDT speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT IS THE PHILOSOPHY BEHIND YOUR ARTWORK?

BS/ I combine the notion of traveling in real life and in my mind, searching and documenting divisions of space, markings and mappings as a reflection of a search for identity and place. I explore the subtle interaction between nature, process and imagination, creating systems and layers of meaning, through building up of surfaces and using recycled materials.

CM/ FROM WHERE DO YOU DRAW YOUR MAIN INSPIRATIONS?

BS/ Having grown up in four countries as the daughter of an archeologist, I primarily draw inspirations from my childhood in Greece. The colors blue and white have great meaning to me. I am also Inspired by the beauty and natural patterns and typologies that I’ve discovered on my travels in Egypt, Vietnam, Japan, and Burma. I trace with the camera, pencil and paintbrush the impact that our environment has on our imagination—and vice versa.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?

BS/ My studio is my sanctuary. We built our house (my husband, Philippe Cheng, is also an artist), with two adjoining studios. Our mantra as artists, parents and community members is is to live in a way that there is no separation between art and life. Our children were always integrated in our studio practice.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE FAVORITE ROUTINES?

BS/ I go to the beach for a morning walk to clear my mind and get ready for the day. It's like a daily meditation.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

BS/ Almond Zigmund, Philippe Cheng.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW 

DAVID SLIVKA

Slivka’s iconic early 1970s ink paintings pop, their raw abstract power expressed through strong sculptural shapes in black and white or vibrant color.
— Coco Myers

David Slivka (1914-2010) was one of the last remaining members of the first generation of American Abstract Expressionist artists. Known as both a painter and sculptor, he worked in a variety of mediums, from ink, crayon, and watercolor, to clay, granite, bronze, and wood.

In the early 1960s, Slivka did a series of rapid ink paintings. In the 1970s, he continued this work in ink, creating a series of large, organic, curvilinear abstract paintings. Some are in vivid tones; others in graphic black and white. Several of the pieces from this era were sold to the New York Port Authority and some were destroyed in the Twin Towers bombing on 9/11.

Slivka was born in Chicago and studied at the Art Institute of Chicago. He spent most of his adult life living and working in Greenwich Village, in New York City. He was part of what came to be known as the New York School, along with Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Louise Bourgeois, Robert Motherwell, and many others. During the 1950s, he and his wife made their way to the Springs, on the East End of Long Island, joining other abstract expressionists such as Pollock and de Kooning who had migrated from the Village. Slivka’s deep connection to nature and art would fuse with this area for the next sixty years.


Untitled 1, early 1970s, ink on paper, 38 x 50 in

Untitled 1, early 1970s, ink on paper, 38 x 50 in

PORTFOLIO

current & recently sold work


Reflections on DAVID SLIVKA

“The sculptor David Slivka told me about going to an artists’ picnic at Barnes Landing in 1953. He arrived driving his ’32 DeSoto, a car he bought used from the printmaker Louis Schanker . . . At the cookout on the beach were Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner, Jim and Charlotte Brooks, Bill and Elaine de Kooning, who that summer were staying at Leo Castelli’s on Georgica Pond. Of course, David’s wife Rose, later The {East Hampton} Star’s art critic, was also present. There was plenty of food, alcohol, and a giant bonfire. The swimming was nude, followed by some dancing around the fire. David loved to dance . . . When the time came to return home, Bill and Jackson both wanted to ride in David’s DeSoto, which they called his “Surrealist car,” since its upholstery was falling apart in a fantastic fashion . . . David made vivid the history of Abstract Expressionism as it evolved in the city and on eastern Long Island. When I recorded him for my forthcoming biography of Lee Krasner, he talked about both her and Jackson, as well as about many others . . . He represented so well an entire cultural moment that has now almost disappeared.”

– excerpt from: “Guestwords: Remembering David Slivka,” The East Hampton Star, April 15, 2010, by Gail Levin, Ph.D., distinguished Professor of Art History, Baruch College and the CUNY Graduate Center


JANICE STANTON

Stanton’s photographs and collages, both full of nuanced meaning, are beautifully balanced and compelling.
— Coco Myers

“In all my work—still photography, film, and collage—I seek to create something revelatory. I am keenly interested in the interplay of words, ideas and visual imagery. Travel and cultural exploration also inform my work: In my surroundings I find the texture and detail from which I create abstract moments from everyday life.

The lines between photography, painting and collage are deliberately blurred in my abstract work; sometimes all three appear in a single piece. Texture, layering and a carefully selected palette are key elements.

In my more narrative work, recurring themes suggest loss, absence and aspects of the human condition; or I may simply explore a color, or a particular material or medium.

Among the materials in my collages are found objects, pieces of my own photographs, calligraphy, and remnants of daily life. All a consequence of never averting my eyes.” — JS


Born in Montreal, Canada, Janice Stanton is based in New York City and Bridgehampton, New York.  After many years working in still photography, she began creating documentary films about artists.  Her keen visual sense, along with an interest in composition and combining text and found materials led her to collage, her preferred medium.

Stanton studied at The Art Students League, the International Center of Photography, the School of Visual Arts, and in workshops with photographers Mary Ellen Mark, Sally Gall, Peter Turnley and Arlene Collins.

Her work has been exhibited in numerous galleries, including Ricco Maresca Gallery, New York; the Art Students League, New York, NY; Guild Hall and folioeast, East Hampton, NY; the White Room Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; and is also in many private collections.


Abstract 5, 2019, digital pigment print, 20 x 24 in, edition of 10

Abstract 5, 2019, digital pigment print, 20 x 24 in, edition of 10

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold photography


JANICE STANTON speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MATERIALS DO YOU USE IN YOUR COLLAGES?

JS/ In some cases, I begin creating a collage with one of my own photographs. My preferred materials are handmade paper, mesh, gauze, string and found materials. I am drawn to textures, semi-transparency and how the age and condition of materials contributes to the theme or mood of the work. Obsolete objects from daily life also find their way into my collages, lending a note of unexpected recognition or nostalgia.

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END? DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE SEASON OUT HERE?

JS/ The East End has been my 'second home' since graduating from college. The light is nothing short of magic, and I couldn't live without the beach walks that I take throughout the year. I love the long days and sunsets of July, but I also love the 'off-season' and find it an even more creative time. Perhaps that is because my work happens when I'm indoors.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?

JS/ I have a studio space in Sagaponack and also in West Chelsea in NYC. I work indoors, surrounded by a vast array of collage materials.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END THAT INSPIRE YOU?

JS/ Favorite places for walks and dinners with friends are the beaches, especially Gibson and Peter's Pond; and in the winter, I gravitate toward cozy spots with fireplaces. The Parrish and Longhouse Reserve are favorite cultural institutions.

CM/ DO YOU FEEL A CONNECTION TO THE HISTORY OF THE ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT ON THE EAST END?

JS/ Yes! It is probably my favorite period, period. It has had the single greatest influence on my eye and my aesthetic. I produced a documentary film about Grace Hartigan, who was part of that movement and knew many of the icons of the time; and I knew, personally, some of the other artists such as Jane Wilson.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS AT HOME? ANY PARTICULAR ARTIST THAT YOU WOULD LOVE TO HAVE?

JS/ Yes. I have a large oil by Anne Raymond and many pieces by Victor Elmaleh. He lived in Bridgehampton and showed his work in the Hamptons and NYC. I would LOVE to have a de Kooning!


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of photography


ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold mixed media


JANICE STANTON

Stanton’s photographs and collages, full of nuanced meaning, are beautifully balanced and compelling.
— Coco Myers

“In all my work—collage and photography—I seek to create something revelatory. I am keenly interested in the interplay of words, ideas and visual imagery. Drawing inspiration from the art and culture of locations around the world, my work also reflects the natural environment closest to me, especially the light and textures of the East End of Long Island.

The lines between photography, painting and collage are deliberately blurred in my abstract work; sometimes all three appear in a single piece. Texture, layering and a carefully selected palette are key elements.

In my more narrative work, recurring themes suggest loss, absence and aspects of the human condition; or I may simply explore a color, or a particular material or medium.

Among the materials in my collages are found objects, pieces of my own photographs, calligraphy, and remnants of daily life. ” — JS


Born in Montreal, Canada, Janice Stanton is based in New York City and Bridgehampton, New York.  After many years working in still photography, she began creating documentary films about artists. Her keen visual sense, along with an interest in composition and combining text and found materials led her to collage, her preferred medium.

Stanton studied at The Art Students League, the International Center of Photography, the School of Visual Arts, and in workshops with photographers Mary Ellen Mark, Sally Gall, Peter Turnley and Arlene Collins.

Her work has been exhibited in numerous galleries and venues including Anders Wahlstedt Fine Art (NYC), where she was featured in a 2-person exhibition; the Art Students League (NYC); FolioEast locations on the East End; Memorial Sloan Kettering (NYC); The White Room Gallery (Bridgehampton); Guild Hall (Easthampton); The Art Barge (Napeague); and is also in many private collections.


There Came A Day At Summer's End, 2018, photograph, photo corner, Kraft paper, rice paper, gauze, chalk, graphite, 18 x 14 in (framed)

There Came A Day At Summer's End, 2018, photograph, photo corner, Kraft paper, rice paper, gauze, chalk, graphite, 18 x 14 in (framed)

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold mixed media


JANICE STANTON speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MATERIALS DO YOU USE IN YOUR COLLAGES?

JS/ In some cases, I begin creating a collage with one of my own photographs. My preferred materials are handmade paper, mesh, gauze, string and found materials. I am drawn to textures, semi-transparency and how the age and condition of materials contributes to the theme or mood of the work. Obsolete objects from daily life also find their way into my collages, lending a note of unexpected recognition or nostalgia.

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END? DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE SEASON OUT HERE?

JS/ The East End has been my 'second home' since graduating from college. The light is nothing short of magic, and I couldn't live without the beach walks that I take throughout the year. I love the long days and sunsets of July, but I also love the 'off-season' and find it an even more creative time. Perhaps that is because my work happens when I'm indoors.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?

JS/ I have a studio space in Sagaponack and also in West Chelsea in NYC. I work indoors, surrounded by a vast array of collage materials.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END THAT INSPIRE YOU?

JS/ Favorite places for walks and dinners with friends are the beaches, especially Gibson and Peter's Pond; and in the winter, I gravitate toward cozy spots with fireplaces. The Parrish and Longhouse Reserve are favorite cultural institutions.

CM/ DO YOU FEEL A CONNECTION TO THE HISTORY OF THE ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT ON THE EAST END?

JS/ Yes! It is probably my favorite period, period. It has had the single greatest influence on my eye and my aesthetic. I produced a documentary film about Grace Hartigan, who was part of that movement and knew many of the icons of the time; and I knew, personally, some of the other artists such as Jane Wilson.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS AT HOME? ANY PARTICULAR ARTIST THAT YOU WOULD LOVE TO HAVE?

JS/ Yes. I have a large oil by Anne Raymond and many pieces by Victor Elmaleh. He lived in Bridgehampton and showed his work in the Hamptons and NYC. I would LOVE to have a de Kooning!


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of mixed media


ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold photographs


BARBARA THOMAS

Trees, fields, flowers . . . Thomas starts with elements pulled from nature, which she then interprets in a refreshingly original way.
— Coco Myers

“The natural world is the inspiration for my drawing, painting and multi-media work. I use all of its visual forms—land, plants, flowers, animals, and natural phenomena, such as weather and the seasons. I assign metaphorical properties to the forms of nature, based on my personal reactions and interpretations of the way nature is viewed in the contemporary context—in terms of history, aesthetics, philosophy and politics.

My work begins with direct observation recorded in painting and photography. I create a story for myself that centers around anthropomorphized natural forms, likening and relating their experiences to human experience. Graphically manipulating colors, forms, and contexts, I give natural forms a new kind of life and new relationships, with each other, and with the manmade world.” — BT


Barbara Thomas grew up on a farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, surrounded by artists. She began studying at age 15 at The Art Students' League, New York, under American Naturalist painter Edwin Dickinson (1891-1978). She went on to study at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY, receiving her MFA at Lesley University, Boston, MA.

Thomas began her career as a commercial artist, art director and illustrator, and switched to painting full time in the early 1980s, inspired by her move to the East End of Long Island. She established a following as a house, garden, and property portraitist, with commissions from all over the world, but predominantly working in the Hamptons.

Her fine art has been shown at Ille Arts, Amagansett, NY; Estia Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; Grenning Gallery, Rebecca Cooper Gallery and Canio’s Gallery, in Sag Harbor, NY; Elaine Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; Lizan Topps Gallery, East Hampton, NY; and Wally Findlay Gallery, New York, NY.

Thomas has taught and lectured extensively, including at the Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY. and at her studio in East Hampton, NY.


Thomas in her studio

Thomas in her studio

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold painting


BARBARA THOMAS speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ HOW DO YOU TYPICALLY START TO CREATE?

BT/ Almost always using natural forms to begin ideas, I draw small sketches in my sketchbook. I use a lot of digital research, taking images from public domain, or using my own photographs, and playing with them in digital graphics. Then I use those as a base for creating images in more traditional mediums.

CM/ HAVE YOU ALWAYS LIVED ON THE EAST END?

BT/ My family began coming here in summers over fifty years ago. I then moved here full time when I was a young woman, raising my son here. I moved to New York City for a time, but then moved back about fifteen years ago.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

BT/ This is where I turned to art making full time (I had worked for ten years as an advertising art director). I was inspired by the beauty of the landscape, but I have always been a nature girl, and have always used nature themes in my work.

CM/ DOES THE TIME OF YEAR INFLUENCE YOUR WORK?

BT/ The seasons play a key role in all my work. I don't differentiate them based on one better than the other. They all have a brilliance and distinct properties that find their way into my work.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK? IN A STUDIO SPACE, OUTSIDE, VARIED SPACES?

BT/ I have a studio in Springs, but I am also a plein air landscape painter, or I work outdoors abstractly, using the light and atmosphere of the landscape in my work.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE THINGS TO DO OUTDOORS?

BT/ I love Barcelona Point, and take my Parrish Art Museum plein air painting class out there every summer. A particular summer ritual is paddle boarding across Accabonac Harbor, out to the far side of Gerard Point, pull in, and go for a long swim.

CM/ DO YOU DRAW INSPIRATION FROM THE ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT ON THE EAST END?

BT/ Very much so. I live right near Jackson Pollock's house and studio, and near Willem de Kooning's studio as well. My work contains a lot of abstraction.

CM/ IF YOU COULD CHOOSE ANYTHING, IS THERE ANY PARTICULAR EAST END ARTIST OR PIECE THAT YOU WOULD LOVE TO HAVE?

BT/ I don't own one, but I loved Sheridan Lord, he was my mentor in my early painting years. I've always respected a lot of Terry Elkins' work. I wish I could have a Cile Downs painting.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold mixed media

BARBARA THOMAS

Trees, fields, flowers . . . Thomas starts with elements pulled from nature, which she then interprets in a refreshingly original way.
— Coco Myers

“The natural world is the inspiration for my drawing, painting and multi-media work. I use all of its visual forms—land, plants, flowers, animals, and natural phenomena, such as weather and the seasons. I assign metaphorical properties to the forms of nature, based on my personal reactions and interpretations of the way nature is viewed in the contemporary context—in terms of history, aesthetics, philosophy and politics.

My work begins with direct observation recorded in painting and photography. I create a story for myself that centers around anthropomorphized natural forms, likening and relating their experiences to human experience. Graphically manipulating colors, forms, and contexts, I give natural forms a new kind of life and new relationships, with each other, and with the manmade world.” — BT


Barbara Thomas grew up on a farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, surrounded by artists. She began studying at age 15 at The Art Students' League, New York, under American Naturalist painter Edwin Dickinson (1891-1978). She went on to study at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY, receiving her MFA at Lesley University, Boston, MA.

Thomas began her career as a commercial artist, art director and illustrator, and switched to painting full time in the early 1980s, inspired by her move to the East End of Long Island. She established a following as a house, garden, and property portraitist, with commissions from all over the world, but predominantly working in the Hamptons.

Her fine art has been shown at Ille Arts, Amagansett, NY; Estia Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; Grenning Gallery, Rebecca Cooper Gallery and Canio’s Gallery, in Sag Harbor, NY; Elaine Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; Lizan Topps Gallery, East Hampton, NY; and Wally Findlay Gallery, New York, NY.

Thomas has taught and lectured extensively, including at the Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY. and at her studio in East Hampton, NY.


Thomas in her studio

Thomas in her studio

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold painting


BARBARA THOMAS speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ HOW DO YOU TYPICALLY START TO CREATE?

BT/ Almost always using natural forms to begin ideas, I draw small sketches in my sketchbook. I use a lot of digital research, taking images from public domain, or using my own photographs, and playing with them in digital graphics. Then I use those as a base for creating images in more traditional mediums.

CM/ HAVE YOU ALWAYS LIVED ON THE EAST END?

BT/ My family began coming here in summers over fifty years ago. I then moved here full time when I was a young woman, raising my son here. I moved to New York City for a time, but then moved back about fifteen years ago.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

BT/ This is where I turned to art making full time (I had worked for 10 years as an advertising art director). I was inspired by the beauty of the landscape, but I have always been a nature girl, and have always used nature themes in my work.

CM/ DOES THE TIME OF YEAR INFLUENCE YOUR WORK?

BT/ The seasons play a key role in all my work. I don't differentiate them based on one better than the other. They all have a brilliance and distinct properties that find their way into my work.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK? IN A STUDIO SPACE, OUTSIDE, VARIED SPACES?

BT/ I have a studio in Springs, but I am also a plein air landscape painter, or I work outdoors abstractly, using the light and atmosphere of the landscape in my work.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE THINGS TO DO OUTDOORS?

BT/ I love Barcelona Point, and take my Parrish Art Museum plein air painting class out there every summer. A particular summer ritual is paddle boarding across Accabonac Harbor, out to the far side of Gerard Point, pull in, and go for a long swim.

CM/ DO YOU DRAW INSPIRATION FROM THE ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT ON THE EAST END?

BT/ Very much so. I live right near Jackson Pollock's house and studio, and near Willem de Kooning's studio as well. My work contains a lot of abstraction.

CM/ IF YOU COULD CHOOSE ANYTHING, IS THERE ANY PARTICULAR EAST END ARTIST OR PIECE THAT YOU WOULD LOVE TO HAVE?

BT/ I don't own one, but I loved Sheridan Lord, he was my mentor in my early painting years. I've always respected a lot of Terry Elkins' work. I wish I could have a Cile Downs painting.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW