SCOTT BLUEDORN

More than just technically superb, Bluedorn’s fantastical paintings and drawings conjure up a world between the real and the imagined.
— Coco Myers

“Whether in my painting, drawing, printmaking, or found object assemblage, I am an observer of the natural world and its collision with a modern society. I create drawings that celebrate the mystery and magic of the natural world in a supernatural sense. I am an avid traveler and draw from direct experience of a place, making work that hints at the wonder present in every detail of creation. I draw inspiration from cultural anthropology, primitivism, and nautical tradition, distilling imagery that speaks to the collective unconscious, especially through myth and visual storytelling—a world I conjure as “maritime cosmology.” – SB


Scott Bluedorn was born in 1986, in Southampton, NY and received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. He has exhibited extensively on the East End of Long Island, including at the Southampton Art Center, Kathryn Markel in Bridgehampton; folioeast and Roman Fine Arts in East Hampton; the Whaling Museum, Sag Harbor; Crush Curatorial and Ashawagh Hall, Amagansett; the Parrish Art Museum, Watermill, NY, as well as in galleries in Nantucket, New York City, and Miami. Bluedorn’s work is in the collection at The Edward Albee Foundation in New York City, and is included in numerous private collections in the US, Canada, Ireland, France and Portugal. He lives and works in East Hampton, NY.


Bluedorn in his studio

Bluedorn in his studio

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold drawings


SCOTT BLUEDORN speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU WORK IN SEVERAL MEDIUMS?

SB/ I use acrylics, watercolors, inks, graphite, and wood. Each material lends its own capability in expression. I use a range of media and try to challenge myself by always experimenting with new ones. Recently I have turned to various print processes, such as solar plate etching, which is an unusual and versatile printmaking medium.

CM/ HOW DO YOU CHOOSE YOUR SUBJECT MATTER?

SB/ My inspiration comes from various sources — imagery, mythology, anthropology, historical documents and direct experience. I have always used drawing as my primary mode of expression, which is a starting point for how I construct a picture, which may then become an object or assemblage.

CM/ YOU WERE BORN AND RAISED HERE. WHAT CONTINUES TO BE THE BIGGEST DRAW?

SB/ The ocean has been the largest influence in my life, and is a constant generator for my inspiration. Having always been surrounded by its presence, I can’t help but let it seep into my work through many different lenses.

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF YEAR ON THE EAST END?  AND YOUR FAVORITE PLACE?

SB/ Fall on the east end is the best of all worlds. Warm temperatures, harvest time, wave season, depopulation . . . I always like Montauk for its primal edge of the world feel. As a surfer, the waves are a big draw, but also the secluded coves, bluffs and forest trails are much different than other places on the east end.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

SB/ I have a small collection of works traded with other local artists, including Paton Miller, Dalton Portella, Sydney Albertini, Grant Haffner, Colin Goldberg, Billy Strong, Christian Little, and various anonymous "street artists.”


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of drawings

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold paintings

CAROLYN CONRAD

Conrad’s “constructed” photos of stripped-down architectural forms have an unexpected painterly quality—serene yet powerful. Her lint and string assemblages in neutral tones are unique and beautifully nuanced.
— Coco Myers

“During the last several years I have created three series of hand-built iconic structures, arranged in the studio then photographed in natural light. My intent was to compose the familiar landscapes of New England and Long Island by building small scale stage sets out of clay, wood, and canvas, then painting and drawing the back drops. The resulting rural scenes evoke an impression of loss and reverie. In the third of the series there is no narrative. Line and structure remain, implying interior and exterior space. Simplifying is what I like to do best.

The dryer lint work, minimal and process-based, is about collecting and assembling. One work can take up to a year to complete. Literally and metaphorically the pieces have been inspired by “working around the house.” The lint assemblages pare away as much as possible yet still continue to evoke the impressions of home and memory of place.

I have also begun a body of work assembling blocks of painted paper, binding them with string in a grid pattern. Collecting a number of bound blocks (or books), I assemble a low relief and abstract woven tableau. A single gridded block reveals the simplicity of form and material.

Concurrently, I am painting and staining paper, building up layers of paint, washing some layers away and leaving worn palimpsest surfaces of exterior sites and floor plans. I love the idea of building forms and spaces of a questionable entity.” — CC


Carolyn Conrad was born in Massachusetts and grew up in a rural town steeped in New England history, a large source of her inspiration. Her early art training at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and undergraduate work at Massachusetts College, helped form her minimalist and conceptual aesthetic. She first exhibited in and around Boston and then moved to New York City, where she received a MFA from New York University. She currently maintains a studio in Sag Harbor, NY.

Conrad’s work has been widely exhibited in galleries, institutions and museums. Exhibitions and installations include: Parrish Museum, Southampton, NY; Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, NY(solo); folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Pamela Williams Gallery, Amagansett, NY; Flinn Gallery, Greenwich, CT; Alex Ferrone Gallery, Cutchogue, NY; Art in General, New York, NY; Atlantic Gallery, New York, NY; Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis MA; Islip Museum, Islip, NY; Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah, NY; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA; De Cordova Museum, Lincoln, MA; New England School of Photography (solo), Boston, MA; Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, MA; and Cloitre des Billettes, Paris, France.


String Series #9, watercolor on paper, string, 18 x 24 in, $2,000

String Series #9, watercolor on paper, string, 18 x 24 in, $2,000

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold mixed media


CAROLYN CONRAD speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MATERIALS DO YOU PRIMARILY USE? AND WHY?

CC/ My favorite materials are paper, linen, canvas, clay, plaster, wood, watercolor and graphite/charcoal. I like materials that take and absorb stain—a material washed, rubbed, pressed into another surface. Edges usually blur or soften, implying times past.

CM/ CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE TECHNIQUES THAT YOU USE TO CREATE THE IMAGES OF HOUSES IN YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY?

CC/ The architecture of "house" and surroundings are my favored icons constructed or deconstructed in a minimal setting. For the last several years I have constructed stages in the studio for the images I photograph. I make the props in the photos with drawings, paintings and by sculpting and constructing, moving objects around and playing with the light before snapping the shutter. The process is limitless but the outcome can take days or weeks.

CM/ WHAT ABOUT YOUR NEW DRYER LINT PIECES AND STRING PIECES?

CC/ My dryer lint work has been ongoing for ten years. Like some of my other work, constructions or assemblage, they engage in a process of containment: How to keep delicate, fragile materials together. Binding stacks of paper gives me the satisfaction of order and control.

CM/ WHEN DID YOU MOVE OUT HERE?

CC/ I moved to Sag Harbor in 1997 with my son and husband after living for twenty years in SoHo. I felt a need to reconnect with my rural roots in New England and was also in need of a new expanded horizon.

CM/ SO THE AREA INSPIRES YOUR WORK?

CC/ Working with the "memory of place," my early beginnings in New England and now the East End of Long Island are definitive influencing factors.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME? WHO WOULD LIKE TO OWN?

CC/ Mary Ellen Bartley, Linda Alpern, Jenny Gorman, James DeMartis, Eric Dever, Claire Watson, Toni Ross. Would love work by Mary Heilmann or Keith Sonnier.

CM/ ANYTHING ELSE YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE ABOUT YOUR WORK/PROCESS?

CC/ I often think how much easier it would be to put pencil or paint to paper or canvas and not go through many steps before completion of a piece. But my work habits have been there for years and are part of my personality.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of mixed media

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold painting

PAMELA DOVE

A spontaneous spirit runs throughout Dove’s monotypes—they give a room a spark of energy.
— Coco Myers

“With my designs I seek to contain reverberating, sometimes jarring images within the confines of the page through the use of color, texture and often mixed media. Whether literal or symbolic, these themes are reinforced through asymmetry, uneven shapes, strength of order and hand-mixed color.

I work with various techniques and combinations of mono- printmaking, hand-coloring and chine collé collage to achieve my vision. The dichotomy of chaos and calm informs and directs my work.” — PD


Pamela Dove was born in New Jersey and graduated with a BFA from Boston University. She began her career as a graphic designer, then worked as an art director and creative director in advertising. Dove ultimately found her niche in printmaking at the National Academy Museum School in NYC.

Her version of printmaking combines elements of texture, color and design in a compelling manner that is both visceral and intellectually stimulating.

Dove’s work has been in numerous exhibitions, including: Guild Hall and folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Sea Green Designs, Southampton, NY; Bailey House, New York, NY; IPCNY, New York, NY; National Academy Museum, New York, NY; and the Longoria Collection, Houston, TX.

Dove lives in New York City and Southampton, NY.


Dove in her studio

Dove in her studio

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


PAMELA DOVE speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ DESCRIBE YOUR PROCESS OF PRINTMAKING.

PD/ I use oil-based ink, usually on an acrylic plate; the color is more intense than a water soluble pigment. Occasionally I add textural elements such as cardboard, or string. I use rollers, brushes, splashes and more... always working to produce new effects on the paper.

CM/ WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT THIS ART FORM? HOW IS IT SIMILAR TO AND DIFFERENT THAN PAINTING?

PD/ My work looks very much like abstract painting, as my style is very free. However, ultimately every piece goes through a printing press. There is a certain amount of control but the final result is always a surprise.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

PD/ Being in the country is a welcome contrast from the drama and intensity of my city life. But I have to say, I need both.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END?  

PD/ I love Surf Lodge, Tutto Il Giorno, the American Hotel . . . and happy to walk on Cryder Beach anytime.

CM/ IF YOU COULD CHOOSE ANYTHING, IS THERE ANY PARTICULAR EAST END ARTIST OR PIECE THAT YOU WOULD LOVE TO HAVE?

PD/ Reaching for the stars? Eric Fischl.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

DIANE ENGLANDER

Englander’s small works have outsized personality and charm. Her creative use of color and shape makes each piece really feel unique.
— Coco Myers

“In my work I aim for a place between discord and tranquility, for the spot with a charged harmony that energizes while also providing refuge. To reach that goal I play one formal element against another to create some friction or conflict within a generally contemplative piece.

The material in front of me—found or repurposed papers, cloth, pieces of wood—influences my direction, as does inspiration from the world outside the studio: a wall, a landscape, a play of shadow.

When the work transmits to me a calm energized by tension, then it is done. Occasionally that happens the same day, or weeks or months later, sometimes never; and then maybe its remnants become a source of inspiration for the next piece.” — DE


A native of New York City, Englander was brought up going to galleries and museums, a sometimes reluctant attendant to her parents’ passion for looking and collecting.

Before beginning to make art herself, she worked as a lawyer for several years and then as a management consultant to local nonprofits concerned with poverty or disenfranchisement.

In late 2006, Englander began making collages that started her on her current path. She studied with Bruce Dorfman at the Art Students League in New York and in 2012 attended the Vermont Studio Center with an artist’s grant. In 2013 she won the Allied Artists of America award at the Butler Institute of American Art. She currently maintains studios in New York City and Southampton, NY.

Englander has had solo exhibits at the Alexey von Schlippe Gallery at U.Conn-Avery Point; Hampden Gallery at U. Mass., Amherst; the Grubbs Gallery in Easthampton, MA; and at the Living Room Gallery at Saint Peter’s Church in Manhattan. She has exhibited in group shows across the United States and in Italy.


White on Pale Blue with Line, 2019, mixed media on cradled wood panel, 10 x 10 in

White on Pale Blue with Line, 2019, mixed media on cradled wood panel, 10 x 10 in

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


DIANE ENGLANDER speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ DO YOU WORK ON PAPER OR CANVAS OR BOTH? WITH WHAT MATERIALS?

DE/ I work on canvas, on paper, and with wood and cardboard, using acrylic, pencil, ink. I look around my studio and pick up the material that at that moment seems most promising. Often I work from the piece of wood or paper or cardboard just as I find it, perhaps shaped by having been cut or torn from a larger piece. Sometimes I tear or cut almost randomly, and work from that. I am almost always working in different media at the same time, moving from one piece to another.

CM/HOW DO YOU BEGIN A COMPOSITION?

DE/ The color is the first decision with a canvas, because almost all of my canvases have a single background color. And that choice  is intuitive. I look at the tubes of paint and go with my instinct. A lot of the real joy I find in making art springs from discovering inspiration serendipitously. The other day I found in my bin of wood odds and ends two small rectangles of wood glued together, painted, gouged . . . but unappealing. I hurled the pairing at the floor of my studio to break it apart, and then was practically chortling with pleasure at the possibilities offered by these two damaged pieces of wood.

CM/WHY DO YOU WORK ON A SMALL SCALE ?

DE/ I started out working small because I was working at a folding table at the Art Students League. Then I realized I enjoyed making objects that felt much larger than their dimensions. I hope for a sense of monumentality even in small pieces.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

DE/ At the best moments here, with a perfect view of trees in that evening light, or of shadows on the sand, or the feeling of salt water on my skin, I get a sense of calm and of energy that is exactly what I try to transmit through my work.  

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?  

DE/ Our house has a little sunroom that we couldn't figure out how to use, until I finally made it my studio. It's small but it works. It's all windows, surrounded by greenery, and has a small couch where I can read.

CM/ IF YOU COULD CHOOSE ANYTHING, IS THERE ANY PARTICULAR EE ARTIST OR PIECE THAT YOU WOULD LOVE TO HAVE?

DE/ I would love an Esteban Vicente!


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

HIROYUKI HAMADA

The imagery in Hamada’s prints, paintings and sculptures are novel inventions that capture the imagination and hold the eye.
— Coco Myers

“Artists are blessed with that rare moment when everything disappears in our studios except for our works and ourselves—that moment when we feel the profound connection to what we have worked on as it melds with the world, space and time.

Such an occasion is indeed very rare but it is what I strive to capture while I struggle in my studio.

I believe that the exploration to perceive the world far beyond the framework of corporatism, colonialism and militarism continues to be a crucial part of being an artist and being human.” — HH


Hamada was born and raised in Tokyo. He holds an MFA from the University of Maryland, has taught sculpture at Penland School of Craft, and served as a Visiting Artist at the Vermont Studio Center. Over the years, he has been awarded various residencies including those at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, Edward F. Albee Foundation/William Flanagan Memorial Creative Person’s Center, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (Skowhegan Fellowship), Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and MacDowell Colony (The Milton and Sally Avery Fellowship).

Hamada has exhibited widely in gallery and non-commercial settings alike. His work has been shown by Lori Bookstein Fine Art and O.K. Harris Works of Art, New York, NY; Guild Hall and folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Southampton Arts Center, Southampton, NY; Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI; The List Gallery; Swarthmore, PA; Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, SC, among others.

In 1998, Hamada was the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, and in 2009 he was awarded a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship. He was a two time recipient of New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships (2009 and 2017), and was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2018.

Hamada lives and works in East Hampton, New York.


Hamada in his studio

Hamada in his studio

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold drawing & mixed media


HIROYUKI HAMADA speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU ARE A PAINTER AND SCULPTOR AND ALSO MAKE PRINTS. TELL ME ABOUT THE VARIOUS MEDIUMS AND MATERIALS?

HH/ I am working with resin, plaster, and foam for my sculptures. I like that they allow flexibility in the process and they are very easy to work with. My current paintings are mostly done with acrylic paint, which allows me to work fast, although I work very very slow. My prints start as drawings and they are finished on my computer. However, the primal challenge is making the ink alive when it hits the paper. It’s been extremely humbling to work with the elusive quality expressed on papers.

CM/ HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

HH/ I really like to let the work speak for itself. I try hard to listen and see how it wants to manifest itself. I struggle quite a bit in my studio—I try to cultivate a momentum in me to tackle the work, and to connect elements to see cohesive dynamics. I try to be open and flexible about my approach. Sometimes amazing things happen but mostly it’s about trying, failing and mostly, again about listening and seeing.

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END? AND HOW DOES IT INFLUENCE YOUR WORK?

HH/ My wife is from the East End, and I started to come out here around 1998 or so. I think it was probably the first time I’d really felt seasons—the rhythm of nature must be affecting me.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?

HH/ I have a studio next to our house. The building has a few sections for different kinds of work—office area for prints, a little outside space for sanding, cutting, walls for paintings, a wood shop area, and a spray booth.

CM/ DO YOU DRAW INSPIRATION FROM OTHER EAST END ARTISTS?

HH/ I do have respect for those artists in the area and the proximity to their former studios does arouse some sort of a kinship as a fellow explorer of visual elements.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY ANY LOCAL ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

HH/ I have some pieces by Bill King in my studio. He lived a few minutes away from my place and we visited each other’s studios once in a while. His pieces remind me of the memories. We also have received some nice artworks as gifts from our artist friends . . . I guess I would rather see great art in public spaces so that we can all look at them.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of drawing & mixed media

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold sculpture

RJT HAYNES

Haynes’ work makes you feel as if you are right there with the subject; the work is figurative, though filtered through his own eye, and often with a twist of humor.
— Coco Myers

“My father was a sign writer so I grew up surrounded by the smell of paint and turpentine. I have early memories of climbing ladders and scaffolding to help him work on rooftop signs or the paneled sides of heavy goods vehicles.

Although I went on to study German and Philosophy at Oxford, it was probably inevitable that I would end up as a painter. My work is uncompromisingly figurative, but varied in stylistic treatment, content, and medium. No picture should turn out exactly as originally conceived. I am not in control of the process, nor would I want to be. It’s the journey that’s interesting and discoveries made along the way. I will change my technique or the colors on my palette if it starts to feel too familiar and comfortable. The materials and subject have a say in what becomes of them, and painting is always a form of negotiation or collaboration between us.

I’m not so much interested in fleeting impressions as in their lasting effects, memories and echoes: everything we see is full of cultural and personal references, just as words are to a poet; and I want to tap into that—a ‘simple’ lamb or apple is abuzz with symbolism. But images must also ultimately have a life of their own, and make their own connection with the viewer without exegesis, independently of the artist.” — RH


Toby Haynes was born in Essex, England. He now divides his time between Cornwall, New York City and East Hampton, New York. After studying at the University of Oxford, he turned to painting.

Haynes’ work is widely collected and exhibited. He has shown at the Southampton Cultural Center, Southampton, NY; Parrish Art Museum, the Water Mill Museum, Water Mill, NY; Kathryn Markel Fine Arts, Bridgehampton, NY; RJD Gallery, Sag Harbor, NY; Guild Hall and folioeast, East Hampton, Pamela Williams Gallery, Amagansett, NY; and in London at the Battersea Art Fair and The Art Movement. He won consecutive awards at the East End Arts Council juried shows from 2011-2015.


Dark One,2018, charcoal with pastel, 33 x 23 in

Dark One,2018, charcoal with pastel, 33 x 23 in

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold drawings


RJT HAYNES speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MEDIA ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING IN?

RH/ Oils, watercolor, pastel, charcoal, colored pencil, graphite, ink; various combinations of the above. I like to switch media, subjects, styles—it's only a journey if you're moving.

CM/ ANY PARTICULAR TECHNIQUES YOU USE WHEN CREATING?

RH/ Good drawing is key; I never use preliminary sketches or drawing aids, but work freehand, directly on the final canvas or paper, adjusting forms along the way—changes may be visible in the finished work. I often work in series, exploring colors, textures, forms, emotional resonances, as the theme develops. It's important to let the subject and materials have a say in the outcome, but I don't focus much on techniques per se.

CM/ YOU ARE FROM ENGLAND AND SPEND A LOT OF TIME THERE. HOW DO YOU RELATE TO THE EAST END?

RH/ It's interesting to see the Atlantic from both shores. Where I live, in Cornwall, the seasons are less extreme; there’s no real winter, and (some would say) no real summer either, and it's green all year. The East End is all blue and gold in the summer, and much more muted in winter. I like the transition of winter to spring and summer to autumn best: the change of energy in the air.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END?

RH/ My friends have a catboat on Three Mile Harbor—a good place to end a summer's day. The Springs General Store is a good place to start one.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of drawings

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold paintings


LESLEY OBROCK

Obrock’s monoprints have color, character and charm. They feel personal—as if the abstract shapes have a life of their own.
— Coco Myers

“Very simply, I am inspired to make art because I love colors, shapes and textures.

I often start a piece with only a vague intention of composition and color and then let spontaneity and intuition take over. While I sometimes produce work that is representative, I am most moved to paint abstracted landscapes. I enjoy working with materials that have a tactile sensibility and believe in constantly challenging myself with new techniques, concepts and subject matter.” — LO


Lesley Obrock grew up in the Midwest. Her formative childhood experiences, working alongside her seamstress grandmother amidst piles of fabrics and trims, had a profound impact that sparked a lifelong interest in texture, color and pattern.

Obrock studied painting and printmaking at Meramec Community College in St. Louis, MO and obtained a degree in interior design. She went on to open a private gardening business in St. Louis, which she ran for 18 years. She moved to the east end of Long Island in 2008 and returned full-time to making art in a variety of media—primarily printmaking, encaustic, watercolor and acrylic.

A member of the Artist Alliance of East Hampton, East End Arts and Springs Improvement Society, O’Brock has participated in numerous curated and juried shows, including two curated shows at the Islip Art Museum, Islip, NY, and the 2016, 2017 and 2018 Springs Invitational in East Hampton, NY, the Watermill Center, Watermill, NY, and in several folioeast shows in East Hampton. Her work can be found in private collections across the country.


Yellow Green Sky Silhouette, 2019, monoprint, 14 x 14 in (framed)

Yellow Green Sky Silhouette, 2019, monoprint, 14 x 14 in (framed)

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work