SHARI ABRAMSON

A pale, diffused yet nuanced palette combines with strength of brush stroke in Abramson’s poetic abstracts.
— Coco Myers

“My work relies upon the moment I leave my interpretations behind

remembering to leave the window open

the wind feels warm upon my cheek

the sun upon my eyes

summons the light” — SA


Shari Abramson was born and raised in Queens, New York and attended the High School of Music and Art. She got her BA in art history from SUNY at Stony Brook, where she studied under Lawrence Alloway, and her MA in Art Education at New York University, NY. She was a model and friend of Raphael Soyer.

Abramson has taught art in New York City and in Southampton, NY schools, as well as privately in her East Hampton, NY studio. Her work has been exhibited at Spainerman Gallery; folioeast, Arlene Bujesi, and the Ross School Gallery, East Hampton, NY; Silas Marder Gallery, and Kathryn Markel Fine Arts Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; Ashawagh Hall, Amagansett, NY; the Southampton Cultural Center, Southampton, NY: and the James Chapel Gallery, New York, NY, among other galleries.


Descent, 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in

Descent, 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


SHARI ABRAMSON speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MATERIALS DO YOU USE AND WHY?

SA/ Many: Oil, canvas, paper, graphite, ink, pastel, newspaper, gouache, photo transfer, cardboard, and found objects. These materials give me the diversity I need to to form the image I am compelled to express.

CM/ CAN YOU DESCRIBE HOW YOU WORK?

SA/ In the studio I listen to music, paint, print, assemble and watch, looking and eliminating what does not work and keeping what does. Then look again. Continuing this practice until it sits right.

CM/ WHY THE EAST END? WHEN DID YOU MOVE HERE?

SA/ My husband and I came here twenty-five years ago. We wanted to be near the ocean and raise our children here. Its beauty surrounds all I do. The East End holds the beauty of the early sunrise over the bay and the setting sun through the trees. And the changes which occur through the day and night hours.

CM/ DO YOU DRAW INSPIRATION FROM THE HISTORY OF ART ON THE EAST END?

SA/ I see myself in the lineage of the East End artists. The women who created, a stones throw from my home and studio, saw the same sky, water, land and air that I am living with.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME? IF YOU COULD CHOOSE ANYTHING, IS THERE ANY PARTICULAR ARTIST OR PIECE THAT YOU WOULD LOVE TO HAVE?

SA/ I have Burt Glynn, Arnold Rosenberg, Kryn Olson, Roisin Bateman, Camille Perrottet, Gabriele Raacke, Sally Egbert, Bob Golden. Would like Joan Mitchell, Helen Frankenthaler, Conrad Marca-Relli, Don Lenzer.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

ROISIN BATEMAN

With thin veils of oil or a fine dusting of pastels, Bateman’s paintings—inspired by horizon lines—create a natural landing place for the eye.
— Coco Myers

“I grew up in the wild and magical landscape of the west coast of Ireland. The qualities of that landscape with its ever-shifting texture of sea and sky, small rocky fields and hawthorn bushes bent by winter gales, live within me as inner landscape. The continually changing weather—dark moody skies with rolling clouds, which can at any moment give way to a sudden burst of sunlight—bring everything into a heightened state of color and aliveness.

In my oils and pastels, I explore the metamorphic effects of weather upon the landscape. I am intrigued by the way color changes –how it manifests itself and dissipates as elements meet and cross. Working with thin veils of oil, or a fine dust of pastel, which can be rubbed in and lifted off, allows me to explore such an ephemeral subject.

The landscape of eastern Long Island, where I currently live and work, is of a very different quality. Its texture is much more light-reflective – large expanses of sandy shore and flat farmland. The juxtaposition of these two environments creates a tension and a balancing of forces, which provide a very rich soil from which to create new form and expression.” — RB


Roisin Bateman began her life and her art in the west of Ireland. After receiving her BFA from Belfast College of Art in Northern Ireland, she moved to the USA. For the past twenty-five years she has lived on the South Fork of Long Island.

Her paintings, prints, and pastel works have been shown throughout the US and Ireland: at the Peter Marcelle Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; folioeast, East Hampton, NY; the Watermill Center and Sara Nightingale Gallery, Watermill; the Nabi Gallery, Manhattan; at the Heckscher Museum, Huntington, NY; and the Linenhall Gallery in Castlebar, Ireland.


Montauk I, 2018, oil on canvas, 38 x 38 in

Montauk I, 2018, oil on canvas, 38 x 38 in

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


ROISIN BATEMAN speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU WORK IN BOTH OIL AND PASTEL? WHY BOTH?

RB/ I like oil paint, for it richness of color. I like to build up layers using thin veils of color, and oil is an excellent medium for that. Pastel, which is really like colored dust, and so easily blended and worked into, is an ideal medium to explore the play of elements, and the sudden transformations that can happen in nature.  

CM/ How do you begin a painting?

RB/ I empty my mind of thoughts and listen. Through a process of listening and responding, a painting grows organically out of that conversation. I just keep following some kind of invisible thread and it's always a surprise where it leads.

CM/ YOU WERE BORN AND RAISED IN IRELAND. HOW DOES THIS AREA RELATE TO YOUR HOMELAND?

RB/ I've always lived by the shore, and can't imagine life without my daily pilgrimage to look at the changing light on the water. It inspires me endlessly. Even though my work is abstract, much of my inspiration comes from landscape, and weather as a shapeshifter in that landscape.

CM/ YOU WORK IN A STUDIO MOSTLY, YES?  

RB/ I have a studio on my property in Sag Harbor village where I do most of my work. Occasionally I set up a temporary studio when I travel to Ireland or other places that inspire me.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END?  

RB/ Barcelona Neck is a favorite walking spot, because it has a rocky shore and is full of texture, which remind me of the coastline of the west of Ireland were I grew up. The ocean inspires me in a different way—a vast expanse of open sea and sand, it speaks to me and spaciousness the vastness—it's full of possibility.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

SCOTT BLUEDORN

More than just technically superb, Bluedorn’s fantastical paintings and drawings conjure up a world between the real and the imagined.
— Coco Myers

“Whether in my painting, drawing, printmaking, or found object assemblage, I am an observer of the natural world and its collision with a modern society. I create drawings that celebrate the mystery and magic of the natural world in a supernatural sense. I am an avid traveler and draw from direct experience of a place, making work that hints at the wonder present in every detail of creation. I draw inspiration from cultural anthropology, primitivism, and nautical tradition, distilling imagery that speaks to the collective unconscious, especially through myth and visual storytelling—a world I conjure as “maritime cosmology.” – SB


Scott Bluedorn was born in 1986, in Southampton, NY and received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. He has exhibited extensively on the East End of Long Island, including at the Southampton Art Center, Kathryn Markel in Bridgehampton; folioeast and Roman Fine Arts in East Hampton; the Whaling Museum, Sag Harbor; Crush Curatorial and Ashawagh Hall, Amagansett; the Parrish Art Museum, Watermill, NY, as well as in galleries in Nantucket, New York City, and Miami. Bluedorn’s work is also on view at The Edward Albee Foundation in New York City, and included in numerous private collections in the US, Canada, Ireland, France and Portugal. He lives and works in East Hampton, NY.


Bluedorn in his studio

Bluedorn in his studio

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold paintings


SCOTT BLUEDORN speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU WORK IN SEVERAL MEDIUMS?

SB/ I use acrylics, watercolors, inks, graphite, and wood. Each material lends its own capability in expression. I use a range of media and try to challenge myself by always experimenting with new ones. Recently I have turned to various print processes, such as solar plate etching, which is an unusual and versatile printmaking medium.

CM/ HOW DO YOU CHOOSE YOUR SUBJECT MATTER?

SB/ My inspiration comes from various sources — imagery, mythology, anthropology, historical documents and direct experience. I have always used drawing as my primary mode of expression, which is a starting point for how I construct a picture, which may then become an object or assemblage.

CM/ YOU WERE BORN AND RAISED HERE. WHAT CONTINUES TO BE THE BIGGEST DRAW?

SB/ The ocean has been the largest influence in my life, and is a constant generater for my inspiration. Having always been surrounded by its presence, I can’t help but let it seep into my work through many different lenses.

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF YEAR ON THE EAST END?  AND YOUR FAVORITE PLACE?

SB/ Fall on the east end is the best of all worlds. Warm temperatures, harvest time, wave season, depopulation . . . I always like Montauk for its primal edge of the world feel. As a surfer, the waves are a big draw, but also the secluded coves, bluffs and forest trails are much different than other places on the east end.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

SB/ I have a small collection of works traded with other local artists, including Paton Miller, Dalton Portella, Sydney Albertini, Grant Haffner, Colin Goldberg, Billy Strong, Christian Little, and various anonymous "street artists.”


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of paintings

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold drawings

PERRY BURNS


 
In paintings that pop with pattern and color, Burns merges Islamic-inspired shapes with expressive elements of abstraction.
— Coco Myers

“Although I grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut in the seventies, I had the good fortune to travel to Beirut, Lebanon at the age of 13. My uncle was a naval attaché stationed there. He was a very gregarious man and he knew everybody, from street cleaners to diplomats to the Prime Minister. Together we would walk the streets. Beirut was a virtual orgy of the senses. The colors of the people in all manners of dress, the architecture, ornament, craft and culture, the smells wafting from restaurants and street vendors, the sounds of different languages and calls to prayer were so unlike everything I had known in Greenwich. The experience left an indelible impression.

Yet it wasn’t until years later, when I traveled again to Eastern and Islamic countries, that I began to incorporate the sensibility of those cultures into my artwork. I also find inspiration in the nature of the East End—the reflections of the water, the play of sunlight through the fog, and the colors of the sky at ‘the magic hour’ all make their way into even the most abstract of my paintings. For me, however, painting is not the reproduction of nature as much as the dynamism of visual forces. I do not want to reproduce the visible, I want to create an experience of perception.” — PB


Perry Burns was born in New York in 1956. He received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1988.

Burns has lived on the East End of Long Island for the past twenty-five years and has exhibited widely in the area and beyond. His solo shows include: Cheryl Hazan Gallery, New York; ARC Fine Arts, Larchmont, NY; the Islip Art Museum; the Scope Art Fair in London; Sara Nightingale Gallery in Watermill, NY; Lizan Tops Gallery in East Hampton, NY; and Comerford Hennessey in Bridgehampton, NY. Group shows include: Ille Arts and Neoteric Fine Art, Amagansett, NY; Silas Marder Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; the Artists Chose Artists show at the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, NY.; Guild Hall, folioeast and Spanierman Gallery, East Hampton,NY; Spainerman Modern in New York; ArtAspen and ArtHamptons.

Burns in his studio

Burns in his studio


ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


PERRY BURNS speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU ARE KNOWN FOR YOUR OIL PAINTINGS. WHY OIL?

PB/ I find it to be the richest, vibrant and most versatile medium. I build up layers of oil paint, sometimes as many as fifteen to twenty, then strip the painting back using sanders, scrapers, etc. to reveal previous layers and thus, the "history" of the painting.

CM/ ARE YOU INSPIRED OR INFLUENCED BY THE HISTORY OF THE ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT ON THE EAST END?

PB/ Yes, my first studio out here was across the street from the Pollock/Krasner house, and in the neighborhood of Willem de Kooning. I had been studying the abstract expressionists for years and was very influenced by them, though I eventually moved toward other elements in my painting, also being influenced by Islamic art and its sense of history, time, pattern, and repetition.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

PB/ I have works by Donald Baechler, Richmond Burton, and Yung Jake, all of whom used to live on the East End, as well as Darlene Charneco, Alice Hope, Philippe Cheng, and Margaret Garrett, all of whom I love.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

MICHELE D'ERMO

D’Ermo’s paintings pull you into a sea of color, creating an environment of pure sensation.
— Coco Myers

“My paintings hover on the edge of abstraction and are more remembered sensations than direct observations of nature.  

I strive to create poetic environments with the use of organic shapes and saturated surfaces, establishing vistas with minimal imagery. The reduction of details and unoccupied spaces on the canvas bring the imagery closer to the viewers so they can fall further into the painting, pulling them in through color, form and scale. My landscapes can be seen as architecture, in which exterior spaces are read more as interiors.

Painting is my response to the timeless beauty found in the natural world. Art and nature both rely on impulse; I allow my work to be uninhibited, reaching for what lies beneath the surface. I paint as a personal response to what moves me.” — MD


Michele D’Ermo was born in Miami Beach, Florida and spent most of her childhood in Washington DC. She now divides her time between her studios in New York City and East Hampton.

D’Ermo is a self-taught artist whose education in art was an organic process that grew out of observation and early childhood experiences traveling throughout Europe. Her paintings continue to reflect these early impressions as she records her observations of the natural world. As an adult, she studied at the Arts Student League and the New York Academy of Arts.  

D'Ermo's work has been exhibited widely in museums, art fairs and galleries in New York City and on the East End. She has had solo exhibits at the Peter Marcelle Gallery, Southampton, NY, and the 1stdibs Gallery at the New York Design Center. Her work has been in group shows at Silas Marder Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; Guild Hall Museum, Lizan Tops, and folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Ashawagh Hall, Amagansett, NY; the Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY; Elisa Contemporary Arts, Salmagundi Club, and Cheryl Hazen Gallery, New York, NY; North Haven Gallery, North Haven, Maine and Scope at Art Basel, Miami, FL.  D'Ermo often collaborates with interior designers and architects on special projects and commissions and her work is included in many private and public collections.

Ocean Rain, 2018, oil on linen, 36 x 48 in

Ocean Rain, 2018, oil on linen, 36 x 48 in


ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


MICHELE D’ERMO speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU PAINT WITH OILS ON LINEN. WHY?

MD/ The luminosity of oils and the freedom to layer and conceal or highlight are all within the power of a brushstroke. Linen because it allows for more light to be captured due to its varieties of natural textures and colors.

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR MOTIVATION TO PAINT NATURE, HOWEVER ABSTRACTED?

MD/ Inspiration of the natural world was said by Dante to be the art of God. This is not to say that my motivation is restricted to the natural world, rather that although my paintings have reference to the landscape, seascape, weather or natural light, my work remains grounded in visual experience.

CM/ YOU SEEM TO LOVE BLUE. WHAT IS IT ABOUT THE COLOR?

MD/ I have been struck for decades by the beautiful color of the sea, the sky as well as the vastness of the color itself. Ultramarine tastes of the ocean—Italians refer to it as "from beyond the seas." Indigo is like ultramarine in that it refers to where the color historically comes from, rather than what the substance actually is.

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END?

MD/ My love of nature and freedom from the confines of New York City brought me here years ago. The East End also retains a strong artistic identity and traditions that I hold close to my heart.

CM/ SO YOU FEEL CONNECTED TO THE LEGACY OF THE ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISTS?

MD/ History plays a large part. Powerful art was created here at that time. Abstraction allowed for artists to be at a distance from the material world. This was a juxtaposition to the motivations and psyche of New York City. The East End represented freedom of expression.


CM/ DO YOU DO MOST OF YOUR WORK IN YOUR STUDIO?

MD/ I am an observer of my environment so most of the time I am watching and listening to my surroundings. At times I create on the spot as in a nighttime landscape but most often I go to my studio and paint with my emotional  memory of my visual experiences.  That’s where the work actually occurs.

PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW



MARGARET GARRETT

Garrett’s paintings are alive with movement, rhythm and color—expressions of balletic grace.
— Coco Myers

“My childhood was spent dancing. It was my first identity and my first mode of expression as an artist, and one that continues to inform my work to this day. When I begin working on a new piece, I see the paper or canvas as an empty stage and the line as movement. Texture, form, and the way that colors interact are all different manifestations of motion, rhythm, and energy.

While my work is abstract, it can at times evoke shapes and patterns found in nature. I often work in ongoing series, developing a language and following it as it morphs and evolves. Some of my series are more driven by mark making and layers of color, and in others the shapes and the way they interplay are the dynamic force, but in all my work I’m concerned with movement and the overall music of the piece.” — MG


Born in North Carolina and raised in Pennsylvania, Margaret Garrett currently lives and maintains a studio on Shelter Island, New York. She left home at the age of 16 to join the Pennsylvania Ballet Company and later joined the Cleveland Ballet as a soloist. At the age of 22, she began painting, finding a spiritual connection to dance in the movement of line and color.

Garrett’s work has been widely exhibited in galleries, museums and art fairs, including the Parrish Art Museum, the Watermill Center, the Heckscher Museum, Danese/Corey, Art Miami, Art on Paper and the Armory Show. In 2018, she was awarded a fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her work is held in the Parrish Art Museum and Guild Hall Museum and in numerous private and corporate collections in the United States and Europe.


Red, White and Blue, 2018, acrylic on canvas board, 20 x 16 in

Red, White and Blue, 2018, acrylic on canvas board, 20 x 16 in

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


MARGARET GARRETT speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MEDIA ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING IN?

MG/ Acrylic on paper and linen. I like that acrylic dries faster and allows me to work more quickly. I'm also doing a lot of work with film now, using my iPhone to film and Final Cut Pro to edit.

CM/ CAN YOU TALK ABOUT HOW YOUR LOVE OF DANCE IS INCORPORATED INTO YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

MG/ I see line as movement and I’m fascinated by the choreography of everything. I find myself composing a painting by finding the balance of patterns or deciding where to leave space. I’m also very aware of the rhythm or music of the piece. In dancing I frequently find shapes or motions that capture a certain feeling and I incorporate these into my artwork.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

MG/ The light and space has a huge effect on my work and on my psyche. This area has also become such a center for art-making, so it's wonderful to live where there is a community of artists to share work and ideas with.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END?

MG/ I live on the beach on Shelter Island and I love the beach, especially watching the light on the water. I like to take walks around the island and in Mashomack Preserve. I like going out in Sag Harbor with friends. And of course, I love the Parrish and Guild Hall!

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

MG/ I have a watercolor by Eric Fischl, a work on paper by David Salle, a photograph by Ralph Gibson and a painting on paper by George Negroponte. I would love to have many more—too many to name!


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

JONATHAN GLYNN

Glynn’s bold, intricately worked pastels have an energetic quality—the color combinations vibrate like music in a room.
— Coco Myers

“For my pastel series, I chose to employ simple geometric shapes in such a way that the imagery is layered and complex. Each shape or figure becomes part of a number of more intricate patterns that should draw the eye in different ways, thus making their own and unique claim for attention.

I see the imagery as musical—choreographed to show movement. I also chose vibrant colors and used them in combinations that could be considered discordant. In so doing, I hope to jar the viewer out of a conventional manner of looking at color. Ultimately, because of the layering of shape and color, each viewing should yield its own emotional response.” — JG


Jonathan Nash Glynn was born and raised in New Jersey. He graduated from the School of Fine Arts at Tufts University and got his MFA at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. He taught painting at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and ceramics at Montclair State College.

Glynn has exhibited widely across the country. Solo shows include Arthur T. Kalaher Fine Art, Southampton, NY; Pace Collection, Palazetti, Sarah Rentschler Gallery, Littlejohn-Smith Gallery, and Carlyn Gallery, New York, NY; Chrysalis Gallery, Santa Fe, NM; and Carol Getz Gallery, Coral Gables, FL. Group shows include The Watermill Center, Watermill, NY: folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Miller Gallery, New York, NY; Swan Gallery, Philadelphia, PA; Joan Robey Gallery, Denver, CO; Gallerie Martin, Boca Raton, FL; Caroline Lee Gallery, Houston, TX; Gaspari Gallery, New Orleans, LA; and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, among other exhibits.

Glynn is the founder of Wings Over Haiti, a non-profit dedicated to building schools in central Haiti. He lives fulltime in Sag Harbor, NY.


Glynn in his studio

Glynn in his studio

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


JONATHAN GLYNN speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU’VE BEEN WORKING IN PASTELS RECENTLY. WHAT IS THE APPEAL FOR YOU?

JG/ I like pastels because they are so immediate and the colors are so luscious. They allow me to work with composition and unusual relationships with color. As I move forward, exploring abstraction and color, I will be working with acrylics and larger canvases.

CM/ YOUR PASTELS ARE VERY RICH, THE COLORS SATURATED. HOW DO YOU GET THAT EFFECT?

JG/ The most recent pastels on paper also combine other materials. For instance, by using butchers wax all over the surface and then scraping it away and adding more colors, I got some interesting effects—the pastels look like they’re being layered. I do not use pastels in the traditional way of blending subtly; I use them in a direct attacking mode—strong and bold and spontaneous.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA WHEN YOU START A PIECE HOW IT WILL LOOK WHEN IT’S FINISHED?

JG/ Most of the time my work just unfolds; I don't know how it will end up. My interest is to not know exactly where I’m going when I start working on a piece, and to explore areas that are not typical for me. I’m looking for images and ideas that reflect the mystery of it all while keeping myself interested in what I’m doing. Hopefully others will find pleasure or curiosity in these artworks as well.

CM/ HOW DID YOU END UP LIVING IN SAG HARBOR?

JG/ It started with a summer share in 1995 and then I bought my house and did a gut renovation. When I completely rebuilt the house, from an old 1840s whaler’s cottage that was in complete disrepair, the town allowed me to construct an art studio with 20-plus-foot ceilings—which you can’t do now. I feel lucky to have a spacious studio in my home in Sag Harbor Village. I couldn’t ask for more.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE THINGS TO DO OUT EAST?

JG/ I love to hike and kayak with friends and meet Coco and Arthur for drinks!


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW