PHILIPPE CHENG

Cheng’s beautifully blurred images of landscapes are evocative, meditative, and restorative.
— Coco Myers

“My photographs of the East End of Long Island are personal interpretations of a landscape that derives its beauty and power from the earth’s palate and ever-changing seasons.

I seek to evoke a mood rather than capture the minute visual details of a particular view, so I will manipulate the camera, shifting the focus plane, to create scenes that are deliberately blurred. The photographs are dominated by intense color and a gentle abstraction.

The horizon, the sea, the sand and the beach grass of Long Island all make their appearances, but in dreamlike forms, inviting the viewer to share my personal connection with the landscape.” — PC


Philippe Cheng was born and raised in New York City and educated at The School of Visual Arts and New York University. In the early 1990’s he worked at Magnum Photos, assisting photographers Gilles Peress, Inge Morath, Erich Hartmann and Eve Arnold.. He currently maintains a studio in New York City and in Bridgehampton, New York, where he does both commercial and fine art photography.

Cheng’s fine art photography is included in many private collections. He is the winner of the Heckscher Museum’s 2014 and 2016 Long Island Biennial.


Magnolia III, 2019, C print on aluminum with ultra non-glare plexi front, 30 x 40 in, edition of 9

Magnolia III, 2019, C print on aluminum with ultra non-glare plexi front, 30 x 40 in, edition of 9

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


PHILIPPE CHENG speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU HAVE DEVELOPED A SIGNATURE STYLE WITH YOUR BLURRED PHOTOGRAPHS. WHAT’S BEHIND THIS?

PC/ My process simply really about translating and interpreting feelings to a surface. Technique, although interesting unto itself, is a means to an end. What really interests me are the feelings of a moment, of a place, of a line… A color field or gesture that can elicit an emotion.

CM/ DID THIS PROCESS EVOLVE FROM MORE TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY?

PC/ Many other parts of my creative life are done “in focus.” In fact, when I first started photographing here the images were in focus, but while beautiful, they did not speak to the emotion of being this place, in this air and light.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

PC/ Where to begin?

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF YEAR ON THE EAST END?

PC/ Every season presents an opportunity and the understanding of the East End light is an evolving process.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END?

PC/ There is a wealth of this all here, so the answer depends on the moment, the season, the company… The short answer is no favorite, only surprised to find places that are around the corner without knowing they existed so close.

CM/ DO YOU DRAW INSPIRATION FROM THE HISTORY OF THE ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT ON THE EAST END?

PC/ Self-explanatory in that it is inescapable.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

CAROLYN CONRAD

Conrad’s “constructed” photos of stripped-down architectural forms have an unexpected painterly quality—serene yet powerful. Her lint and string assemblages in neutral tones are unique and beautifully nuanced.
— Coco Myers

“During the last several years I have created three series of hand-built iconic structures, arranged in the studio then photographed in natural light. My intent was to compose the familiar landscapes of New England and Long Island by building small scale stage sets out of clay, wood, and canvas, then painting and drawing the back drops. The resulting rural scenes evoke an impression of loss and reverie. In the third of the series there is no narrative. Line and structure remain, implying interior and exterior space. Simplifying is what I like to do best.

The dryer lint work, minimal and process-based, is about collecting and assembling. One work can take up to a year to complete. Literally and metaphorically the pieces have been inspired by “working around the house.” The lint assemblages pare away as much as possible yet still continue to evoke the impressions of home and memory of place.

I have also begun a body of work assembling blocks of painted paper, binding them with string in a grid pattern. Collecting a number of bound blocks (or books), I assemble a low relief and abstract woven tableau. A single gridded block reveals the simplicity of form and material.

Concurrently, I am painting and staining paper, building up layers of paint, washing some layers away and leaving worn palimpsest surfaces of exterior sites and floor plans. I love the idea of building forms and spaces of a questionable entity.” — CC


Carolyn Conrad was born in Massachusetts and grew up in a rural town steeped in New England history, a large source of her inspiration. Her early art training at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and undergraduate work at Massachusetts College, helped form her minimalist and conceptual aesthetic. She first exhibited in and around Boston and then moved to New York City, where she received a MFA from New York University. She currently maintains a studio in Sag Harbor, NY.

Conrad’s work has been widely exhibited in galleries, institutions and museums. Exhibitions and installations include: Parrish Museum, Southampton, NY; Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, NY(solo); folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Pamela Williams Gallery, Amagansett, NY; Flinn Gallery, Greenwich, CT; Alex Ferrone Gallery, Cutchogue, NY; Art in General, New York, NY; Atlantic Gallery, New York, NY; Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis MA; Islip Museum, Islip, NY; Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah, NY; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA; De Cordova Museum, Lincoln, MA; New England School of Photography (solo), Boston, MA; Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, MA; and Cloitre des Billettes, Paris, France.


Moonlit Property, 2010, digital photograph, 31 x 39 in, edition of 6 (8 available)

Moonlit Property, 2010, digital photograph, 31 x 39 in, edition of 6 (8 available)

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold photographs


CAROLYN CONRAD speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MATERIALS DO YOU PRIMARILY USE? AND WHY?

CC/ My favorite materials are paper, linen, canvas, clay, plaster, wood, watercolor and graphite/charcoal. I like materials that take and absorb stain—a material washed, rubbed, pressed into another surface. Edges usually blur or soften, implying times past.

CM/ CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE TECHNIQUES THAT YOU USE TO CREATE THE IMAGES OF HOUSES IN YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY?

CC/ The architecture of "house" and surroundings are my favored icons constructed or deconstructed in a minimal setting. For the last several years I have constructed stages in the studio for the images I photograph. I make the props in the photos with drawings, paintings and by sculpting and constructing, moving objects around and playing with the light before snapping the shutter. The process is limitless but the outcome can take days or weeks.

CM/ WHAT ABOUT YOUR NEW DRYER LINT PIECES AND STRING PIECES?

CC/ My dryer lint work has been ongoing for ten years. Like some of my other work, constructions or assemblage, they engage in a process of containment: How to keep delicate, fragile materials together. Binding stacks of paper gives me the satisfaction of order and control.

CM/ WHEN DID YOU MOVE OUT HERE?

CC/ I moved to Sag Harbor in 1997 with my son and husband after living for twenty years in SoHo. I felt a need to reconnect with my rural roots in New England and was also in need of a new expanded horizon.

CM/ SO THE AREA INSPIRES YOUR WORK?

CC/ Working with the "memory of place," my early beginnings in New England and now the East End of Long Island are definitive influencing factors.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME? WHO WOULD LIKE TO OWN?

CC/ Mary Ellen Bartley, Linda Alpern, Jenny Gorman, James DeMartis, Eric Dever, Claire Watson, Toni Ross. Would love work by Mary Heilmann or Keith Sonnier.

CM/ ANYTHING ELSE YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE ABOUT YOUR WORK/PROCESS?

CC/ I often think how much easier it would be to put pencil or paint to paper or canvas and not go through many steps before completion of a piece. But my work habits have been there for years and are part of my personality.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW OF PHOTOGRAPHY

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold mixed media

SCOTT FARRELL

Farrell’s abstracted photographs appear to be painterly landscapes—which is the beauty and surprise of them. His ethereal, figurative photos are equally captivating.
— Coco Myers

“My photography can best be described as an art of observation. Whether the subject matter is abstracted landscapes or seascapes, flora or figurative, I make a conscious effort to look past the obvious to expose what is often overlooked. My “alternative landscapes” are found in both natural environs and on man-made substrates such as concrete walls, glass panes and on fiberglass, wood and steel hulls. Much of my figurative or representational work is approached from an abstract perspective, with a desire and intent to present the obvious in a somewhat more interesting light.” — SF


Farrell was born in Englewood, NJ and graduated from Fairleigh Dickinson University. After 22 years working in the media industry, he started a custom, fine-art printing business and began his photography career, taking pictures of what he calls “alternative landscapes.” His work can be seen at the Steve Lyons Gallery and PFD Contemporary Art in Chatham, MA; the Stanek Gallery in Philadelphia, PA; and folioeast, East Hampton.

A resident of Huntington, Farrell spends much of his time photographing along the North Fork, as well as favorite locations from Fire Island to Montauk.


Dune Grass Under Fire Red Sky III, 2019, archival pigment print, 12 x 18 in, edition of 10

Dune Grass Under Fire Red Sky III, 2019, archival pigment print, 12 x 18 in, edition of 10

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


SCOTT FARRELL speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK? MOSTLY OUTSIDE?

SF/ Most of my work time is spent outside exploring, observing and shooting. The rest of the time I’m sitting in front of my iMac, running prints and cutting mats. I also have an additional working space in the basement—our seldom used ping pong table comes in extremely handy for laying out work.

CM/ DOES THE LANDSCAPE OF THE EAST END INFLUENCE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY?

SF/ Water, the coastline and beaches have always had a major influence and a huge part of my photographic art. My grandparents lived in Valley Stream so we'd be out on Long Island quite often—especially in summer as my grandfather had a fishing boat at Point Lookout.

CM/ HOW DO YOU GO ABOUT CREATING IMAGES THAT LOOK SO MUCH LIKE PAINTINGS? DO YOU ALTER THEM?

SF/ No, I don't manipulate my images in any attempt to transform them into something they are not. I absolutely love using a camera because it allows me to capture observations and discoveries exactly as I see them.

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF YEAR OUT HERE?

SF/ Winter is, by far and without question, my favorite time of the year on the East End. It's quiet, uncrowded, and the light, tones and textures of the season are so unique and inspiring to me. Also, when it's cold outside I'm less likely to be distracted by gardening and yard work, so I'm certainly more productive from an artistic standpoint.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

SF/ I've recently begun to acquire some East End artists' works. My first was a gift from Greenport photographer Michael Edelson. I also have a painting from Ty Stroudsburg entitled "Orient," a beautiful piece that I feel so fortunate to own.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

FRANCINE FLEISCHER

Fleischer has an eye for balance and harmony; her photos are an elegant and artful interpretation of nature.
— Coco Myers

“I am historically a portraitist. Having grown up in New York City, surrounded by an extraordinary human landscape, I turned to people as my subject of choice. Later in life, when I moved out to the east end of Long Island, I turned my lens to the nature around me—the water, the architecture of nests, the flora and fauna. I approach them all as portraits, finding human characteristics within their shapes and textures. ” — FF


Francine Fleischer was born in New York City in 1960 and spent most of her summers in Paris. She received her BFA in painting and photography at SUNY Purchase and pursued Media Studies at New York University. After graduating, she worked as a first camera assistant and printer to Annie Leibovitz, Kelly Klein and Michel Comte.

Francine’s work is in numerous collections and has been exhibited widely, including at Tanto Tempo Gallery, Kobe, Japan; Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago; Pictura Gallery, Bloomington, Indiana; Photo Off, Paris; Finn Galley, Greenwich, Connecticut; Sara Nightingale Gallery, Watermill, NY; folioeast, East Hampton, NY; and Ille Arts, Amagansett. Her work has appeared in a variety of publications, such as Vanity Fair, Italian Vogue, British Elle, Russian Architectural Digest, Conde Nast Traveler, and Esquire. Her commercial clients have included Armani Exchange, Bloomingdales, Mercedes Benz and Starwood Hotels.

She lives and works in Sag Harbor, NY.


Light Frost  #0388 , 2014, archival pigment print on photo rag, 40 x 27 in, edition of 5 (3 available)

Light Frost #0388, 2014, archival pigment print on photo rag, 40 x 27 in, edition of 5 (3 available)

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


FRANCINE FLEISCHER speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU PHOTOGRAPH NATURE QUITE A LOT, AS WITH THE BIRDS’ NESTS AND SWANS SERIES. WHAT DRAWS YOU TO THOSE SUBJECTS?

FF/ Historically, my subjects were people oriented. Either portraits, fashion or beauty and then came the addition of gardens. When I moved out east, I turned my lens to the amazing nature around me. I approached it all as portraiture.

CM/ DO YOU SET OUT WITH AN IDEA IN MIND OF WHAT YOU’LL SHOOT THAT DAY?

FF/ If I've started a series, then I set out with specific intentions and it becomes a hunting expedition. I get so much gratification when I find the next piece of the puzzle. When I am not working on a specific series or idea, I head out with wide eyes and an open mind.

CM/ IS THERE A SCALE YOU PREFER TO WORK IN?

FF/ The scale is totally determined by the subject and the texture. There is a temptation to go big; however, some things are best viewed intimately.

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END? AND WHEN?

FF/ My husband needed to live near the ocean and I needed to live near my husband. We moved out here in 2000.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

FF/ The light, space, rhythms of nature all play into my work. There is also an enormous and vibrant creative energy out here.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

FF/ Yes. My current favorite is a Carolyn Conrad piece. And of course a fabulous Mark Webber sculpture on our lawn.

CM/ ANYTHING ELSE YOU’D LIKE TO ADD ABOUT YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS OR WHERE YOU SEE YOUR ART GOING?

FF/ I am always open to new concepts while still revisiting old ones. Some series are ongoing for years… not looking to resolve them but instead, to continue the conversation.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

JAIME LOPEZ

Lopez’s photographs play upon and expand conventional perceptions of nature, visually enhancing the familiar.
— Coco Myers

My photographs are a response to the environment around me—not only the natural beauty of the landscape but also the way that the environment is being threatened. These sometimes ominous visions of beauty can be interpreted as a metamorphosis taking place within nature. My hope is that they will evoke a positive action towards ongoing nature preservation and protection.

The phrase ‘art imitates life’ has been a constant theme and inspiration in my career.” 



Lopez in his studio

Lopez in his studio


Jaime Lopez was born in Peru, a country rich in breathtaking landscapes, which became an aesthetic foundation for his lifelong career as a photographer and artist. His vast body of work is a reflection of his journeys across the globe.

Lopez arrived in New York City from Peru to study graphic design at Parsons School of Design in 1980. After three years assisting top fashion photographers in New York City, he began his own fashion photography career, shooting mostly in Italy and Spain. Jaime’s work has been widely published in Elle, Marie Claire, Telva, Hola, GQ, Woman Magazine, Glamour and Cosmopolitan.

In 2000, Lopez returned to the U.S. moving to the East End of Long Island. There, he became captivated by the raw aesthetics and pristine beauty, which inspired the next artistic chapter of his life, photographing the environment around him.

Lopez resides in Sagaponack, NY with his wife, former model Marilyn Clark, their daughters, Raquel and Alexandra, and Ziggy, their Italian greyhound.


ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


JAIME LOPEZ speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS ARE PRINTED ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY ON ALUMINUM; CAN YOU EXPLAIN THE PROCESS?

JL/ It is printing sublimation on aluminum. It has a super quality, with no reflection, and can be hung in different environments, like outdoors, in humid areas or near heat sources without risk.

CM/ HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

JL/ I capture landscapes and reinterpret them, approaching the idea as if I was a painter. All my images have color that’s different than one may expect of a traditional landscape.

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END?

JL/ My wife, Marilyn Clark, is from East Hampton. We had our house in Sagaponack rented while we lived in Europe, and after ten years abroad in Milan and Madrid, decided to move back so our daughters could attend the one-room schoolhouse in Sagaponack.

CM/ YOU DO ALL YOUR FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY HERE?

JL/ Yes. I want to capture this ever-changing landscape so we have a record of how it used to be when we were in the Hamptons.

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SEASON?

JL/ All four seasons. Because of the light and the blend of farmland and ocean—two of my favorite habitats. It seems to me that every day is different and always has a surprise in mood or color.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?

JL/ I photograph outdoors and I just started to work on portraits and still life in my new studio in Sagaponack.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END? ANY THAT HELP YOU FEEL INSPIRED?

JL/ The fields and beaches of Sagaponack. The trails all over the East End are gorgeous and exciting to ride a mountain bike around them in the winter time. In summers, I ride my road bike and motorcycles around the roads in the area. It is a very nice and practical way to discover and get inspired by new sites!


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

JANE MARTIN

Whether a Martin photograph captures the grandeur and power of nature or its subtle complexity, it is always a compelling piece of art.
— Coco Myers

“In The Break series, my photographic study of water captures the 'moment between moments' of surf, invisible to our human eye. These images reveal the inherent sensuality and power of the ocean on the East End, creating a visceral experience for the viewer. Recent winters spent in Byron Bay, Australia have led to an examination of what lies both on the surface of and below water. As evidenced in the Down Under series, I am drawn to waterways and terrains, peering down into their depths and mapping their surfaces. They walk the fine line between abstraction and representation, between the fluid and the solid, remaining ambiguous and bold at the same time. They invite the viewer to question the source: photograph or painting — and therefore the very notion of how we identify what we see. Although the images may appear altered, in this series we find that nature offers the extraordinary in the ordinary… ‘reality’ in the age of manipulation.— JM


Martin was born in Brooklyn, grew up on Long Island where she spent summers on Peconic Bay, and subsequently spent much of her adult life between France and New York City. She studied art in Tours, France under the direction of a former assistant to and student of Hans Hoffmann and evolved as an abstract painter. Exposure to artistically compelling European cinema led her back to New York City where she studied filmmaking at New York University. After a career in filmmaking in both NYC and Paris with the likes of Al Pacino and Gregory Colbert, she directed the documentary film Silent Sentries, broadcast on PBS.

In 1996 she established an art studio on the Lower East Side, returning to painting as a means of creative expression. In 2004, after nearly 15 years of city life, she moved her home and studio to East Hampton, New York, where the focus of her work shifted to the primal and powerful forces found in nature, in particular through her long love for and practice of photography.

Martin’s work has been exhibited in numerous museums, art fairs and galleries in New York City, the East End, Miami, Santa Fe, Dallas, Los Angeles, Australia, and Europe. Martin has had solo exhibitions at Guild Hall, East Hampton, NY and Islip Art Museum, Islip, NY. Her work can also be found in the permanent collection of the Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY; Guild Hall, East Hampton, NY; and in numerous corporate and private collections throughout the world.


The Break 3, 2018, dye sublimation on aluminum, 24 x 56 in, edition of 17 (12 available)

The Break 3, 2018, dye sublimation on aluminum, 24 x 56 in, edition of 17 (12 available)

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


JANE MARTIN speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MEDIUMS DO YOU WORK IN?

JM/ When something calls to me, however undefined it may be at the inception, it seems to speak in the language of a particular medium. So by nature I am a multi-disciplinary artist, currently working primarily in photography and video. Each medium informs and enriches the other as their subjects refer to both the primal power and quieter mysteries of nature.

CM/ WHAT DRAWS YOU TO PHOTOGRAPHY AS A MEDIUM?

JM/ Photography is an act of intimacy. It often allows us to see what we are incapable of observing in the movement of life. The wave images were shot post-hurricane with a 300mm lens – stepping way beyond the danger zone ropes, standing in the raging sea. The format that feels most potent to me is a long horizontal, a 2.4:1 ratio called Anamorphic, that echoes cinematic widescreen. I crop my images according to this ratio, allowing the ocean ‘riffs’ to fill the screen.

CM/ WATER IS A MAIN THEME IN YOUR WORK. WHY?

JM/ Water has become one of the primary subjects of my photographs, whether the primal force of the ocean—the enormous surf of the East End—or the stillness of lakes on the easternmost point of Australia. Water also comes to a perfect stillness as reflected in my more abstract series, shot above tea tree lakes, ‘Down Under,’ once aboriginal birthing grounds. Full of depth and mystery, we find the extraordinary in the ordinary. 

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END?

JM/I first came to the East End in 1998 looking for a weekend respite from New York City. I immediately fell in love with the diversity of waterscapes and its more rural areas combined with the level of cultural sophistication.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

CHRISTINE MATTHÄI

Matthäi’s photographs, with their aura of sensuality and spirituality, are also quite stylish, sometimes even glamorous.
— Coco Myers

“I use photography as a tool to express my feelings and impressions. The original photographic images are digitally transformed so that colors and shapes turn into abstractions of the source image.

My intention is to convey the feeling of losing oneself in space with no sense of time and place, which is similar to the practice of meditation. I often work with multiple layers to achieve the final image, which emerges from my subconscious.

My favorite subject has been water, a fascination that resulted in my Light and Sea series. This work consists of abstract visual meditations on the interplay of air, light and water, the shifting of colors and shapes from form to formlessness. In Light Meditations, the brushing light lines on the water’s surface turn into visual rhythms, repetitive strolls on lines and dots.

With Musings on Words and Poetry, I incorporate repetitions of words and sentences from poetry and letters. The images pay homage to the vanishing word as a carrier of thought. The form of the square represents the four elements of fire, water, air and earth. I use the square as a sacred place to hold multiple layers of writings precious to me. The visual effects are similar to ancient hieroglyphs—an expression of my desire for timelessness and preservation.” — CM


German-born Christine Matthäi’s fascination with photography and film began during her early teens. She graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology in Berlin, then moved to New York City in the mid-eighties, where she started as a photographer’s assistant. Later, she worked as a photojournalist and foreign correspondent for international magazines and newspapers.

Matthäi’s strong connections to the New York art scene stimulated and helped contribute to the exploration of her own artistic creativity. Over a decade ago, she decided to pursue her art photography full time. She moved to the East End in 1992 and now divides her time between Shelter Island and the Bahamas.

Matthäi’s work has appeared in shows at the Alex Ferrone Gallery, Cutchogue, NY; the Watermill Museum, Watermill, NY; folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Monika Olko Gallery and Tullla Booth Gallery, Sag Harbor, NY: ARC Fine Art, Fairfield, CT; ArtHamptons; Grand Gallery, Grand Bahama; Majestic Hotel, Dubai; Amarillo Gallery, Bologna, Italy; and Galerie Melior, Straubing, Germany, among others.


Essence, 2018, photograph on plexiglass, 40 x 40 in, edition of 10 (9 available)

Essence, 2018, photograph on plexiglass, 40 x 40 in, edition of 10 (9 available)

PORTFOLIO

current & recently sold work