ALMOND ZIGMUND

Color, pattern and shape make Zigmund’s works stand out in a room. They have sculptural and graphic impact.
— Coco Myers

“Combining geometry, vivid color, and intricate patterns, my drawings, sculptures, and installations often suggest walls, barricades, enclosures, and other aspects of the built environment. The work is architectonic in nature and tends to engage the eye and body at once.

When working on paper, or directly on the surfaces of existing architectural spaces, I frequently plot precise perspective points to demarcate volumes or plunge viewers into illusory realms.

I cull patterns from a number of architectural sources, both domestic and commercial and grant color a physical presence through the use of bold hues, granular flocking, and adhesive vinyl cutouts. Pattern often transcends its conventional role as embellishment and claims the ability to define forms and clarify spaces.“ — AZ


Almond Zigmund was raised in Brooklyn and received a BFA from Parsons School of Design, in both New York and Paris. She also earned an MFA from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where she studied art theory and criticism with MacArthur Award-winning critic Dave Hickey.

Zigmund’s work has been exhibited internationally for the past decade and a half. Solo exhibits and installations include: the Parrish Art Museum and the Watermill Center, Watermill, NY; The Drawing Room, East Hampton, NY; Salomon Contemporary Collective Design Fair, New York, NY; Tall Wall Gallery, Los Angeles, CA; Ibel Gallery, Columbus, OH; Dust Gallery, Las Vegas, NV; among others.

She currently divides her time between Brooklyn and East Hampton, NY.


Collage X , foam,cardboard, vinyl, fabric, acrylic, 22 x 11 x 2 in

Collage X, foam,cardboard, vinyl, fabric, acrylic, 22 x 11 x 2 in

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


ALMOND ZIGMUND speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ HOW DO YOU START THINKING ABOUT A PIECE? DO YOU BEGIN WITH THE IDEA OF A SHAPE OR A PATTERN?

AZ/ A piece for me takes shape as a thought or vision of a thing that I want to see. The vision might be a fully formed idea (material, color, form) or it may be one of those with the other pieces having to be filled in. The work comes to fruition through the making and the doing.

CM/ HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN A PIECE IS DONE?

AZ/ At some point the original idea is overtaken by the fact of the thing itself and that’s what I start reacting to to get the piece to the point where I can call it finished.

CM/ HOW DO YOU ACTUALLY MAKE THE SCULPTURAL WORK? IS IT ALWAYS OUT OF FOAM?

AZ/ Much of the sculpture I make is out of wood. I collect material that is readily available to me, scraps from the dumpsters that the ubiquitous development that surrounds us in this part of the world affords me. The foam pieces came out of this practice, as did the cardboard.

CM/ ANYTHING TO ADD ABOUT YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

AZ/ I think the idea of creativity is a mythology—making art is hard work and mostly about just showing up and working and doing it again the next day.

CM/ DO YOU OWN WORK BY ANY EAST END ARTISTS?

AZ/ Yes. Bastienne Schmidt, Philippe Cheng, Bob Wilson, Saskia Friedrich, Sabra Moon Eliot.


PORTFOLIO PREVIEW