DENNIS LERI

Leri’s paintings and welded steel sculptures, whether curvy or linear, are pure expressions of abstract form.
— Coco Myers

“As a young person, my need to create art was nurtured by my uncle, who himself was a painter and sculptor. My early training was in figurative sculpture, and my style ultimately developed from representational to abstract sculpture and mixed media conceptual works. I also paint and often create works using both disciplines. Curved shapes, clean minimalist lines, and abstract designs are common themes.” — DL


Dennis Leri was born in Brooklyn, NY and was raised in a family of artists. He attended the Arts Students League, National Academy of Fine Art, the Brooklyn Museum Art School and the Sculpture Center. He lives and maintains a studio in Springs, East Hampton.

Leri’s work has been shown in numerous shows, at Gerald Peters Galleries, New York, NY and Santa Fe, NM; The Southampton Cultural Center, and Peter Marcelle Project, Southampton, NY: Ille Arts, Amagansett, NY; folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Dodds & Eder Sculpture Garden and Robert Hook Gallery, Sag Harbor, NY; Art Hamptons and The White Room Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY, among others. His work has been awarded Best Sculpture and Best Mixed Media at the Guild Hall Museum of East Hampton.


Leri in his studio

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold painting


DENNIS LERI speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MEDIA ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING IN?

DL/ Sculpture: painted, welded steel. Paintings: Acrylic on wood panel, canvas.

CM/ WHAT MATERIALS DO YOU PRIMARILY USE? AND WHY?

DL/ Steel because of its strength and flexibility; wood, metals, and acrylic paints because of the range of opportunities for expression.

CM/ YOU ARE CLEARLY AN ABSTRACT ARTIST. HAVE YOU ALWAYS BEEN?

DL/ My early training was in figurative sculpture, and my style ultimately developed from representational to abstract sculpture and mixed media conceptual works. I also paint and often create works using both disciplines. Curved shapes, clean minimalist lines, and abstract designs are common themes.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?

DL/ My studio is located on my property in Springs. It is primarily for painting and mixed media work. I have an outdoor space where I do the steel work.

CM/ DO YOU OFTEN INTERACT WITH OTHER ARTISTS THAT LIVE/WORK OUT HERE?

DL/ In the more than 30 years that I have lived here, I have had the opportunity to meet and exchange ideas with well established abstract artists who lived and worked in this area, including Ibram Lassaw, Robert Richenburg, Ray Ferren, William King, Eric Ernst, Dan Christensen and Berenice D'Vorzon.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of painting

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold sculpture

JAIME LOPEZ

Lopez’s photographs play upon and expand conventional perceptions of nature, visually enhancing the familiar.
— Coco Myers

My photographs are a response to the environment around me—not only the natural beauty of the landscape but also the way that the environment is being threatened. These sometimes ominous visions of beauty can be interpreted as a metamorphosis taking place within nature. My hope is that they will evoke a positive action towards ongoing nature preservation and protection.

The phrase ‘art imitates life’ has been a constant theme and inspiration in my career.” 



Lopez in his studio

Lopez in his studio


Jaime Lopez was born in Peru, a country rich in breathtaking landscapes, which became an aesthetic foundation for his lifelong career as a photographer and artist. His vast body of work is a reflection of his journeys across the globe.

Lopez arrived in New York City from Peru to study graphic design at Parsons School of Design in 1980. After three years assisting top fashion photographers in New York City, he began his own fashion photography career, shooting mostly in Italy and Spain. Jaime’s work has been widely published in Elle, Marie Claire, Telva, Hola, GQ, Woman Magazine, Glamour and Cosmopolitan.

In 2000, Lopez returned to the U.S. moving to the East End of Long Island. There, he became captivated by the raw aesthetics and pristine beauty, which inspired the next artistic chapter of his life, photographing the environment around him.

Lopez resides in Sagaponack, NY with his wife, former model Marilyn Clark, their daughters, Raquel and Alexandra, and Ziggy, their Italian greyhound.


ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


JAIME LOPEZ speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS ARE PRINTED ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY ON ALUMINUM; CAN YOU EXPLAIN THE PROCESS?

JL/ It is printing sublimation on aluminum. It has a super quality, with no reflection, and can be hung in different environments, like outdoors, in humid areas or near heat sources without risk.

CM/ HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

JL/ I capture landscapes and reinterpret them, approaching the idea as if I was a painter. All my images have color that’s different than one may expect of a traditional landscape.

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END?

JL/ My wife, Marilyn Clark, is from East Hampton. We had our house in Sagaponack rented while we lived in Europe, and after ten years abroad in Milan and Madrid, decided to move back so our daughters could attend the one-room schoolhouse in Sagaponack.

CM/ YOU DO ALL YOUR FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY HERE?

JL/ Yes. I want to capture this ever-changing landscape so we have a record of how it used to be when we were in the Hamptons.

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SEASON?

JL/ All four seasons. Because of the light and the blend of farmland and ocean—two of my favorite habitats. It seems to me that every day is different and always has a surprise in mood or color.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?

JL/ I photograph outdoors and I just started to work on portraits and still life in my new studio in Sagaponack.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE SPOTS ON THE EAST END? ANY THAT HELP YOU FEEL INSPIRED?

JL/ The fields and beaches of Sagaponack. The trails all over the East End are gorgeous and exciting to ride a mountain bike around them in the winter time. In summers, I ride my road bike and motorcycles around the roads in the area. It is a very nice and practical way to discover and get inspired by new sites!


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

JANE MARTIN

Whether a Martin photograph captures the grandeur and power of nature or its subtle complexity, it is always a compelling piece of art.
— Coco Myers

“In The Break series, my photographic study of water captures the 'moment between moments' of surf, invisible to our human eye. These images reveal the inherent sensuality and power of the ocean on the East End, creating a visceral experience for the viewer. Recent winters spent in Byron Bay, Australia have led to an examination of what lies both on the surface of and below water. As evidenced in the Down Under series, I am drawn to waterways and terrains, peering down into their depths and mapping their surfaces. They walk the fine line between abstraction and representation, between the fluid and the solid, remaining ambiguous and bold at the same time. They invite the viewer to question the source: photograph or painting — and therefore the very notion of how we identify what we see. Although the images may appear altered, in this series we find that nature offers the extraordinary in the ordinary… ‘reality’ in the age of manipulation.— JM


Martin was born in Brooklyn, grew up on Long Island where she spent summers on Peconic Bay, and subsequently spent much of her adult life between France and New York City. She studied art in Tours, France under the direction of a former assistant to and student of Hans Hoffmann and evolved as an abstract painter. Exposure to artistically compelling European cinema led her back to New York City where she studied filmmaking at New York University. After a career in filmmaking in both NYC and Paris with the likes of Al Pacino and Gregory Colbert, she directed the documentary film Silent Sentries, broadcast on PBS.

In 1996 she established an art studio on the Lower East Side, returning to painting as a means of creative expression. In 2004, after nearly 15 years of city life, she moved her home and studio to East Hampton, New York, where the focus of her work shifted to the primal and powerful forces found in nature, in particular through her long love for and practice of photography.

Martin’s work has been exhibited in numerous museums, art fairs and galleries in New York City, the East End, Miami, Santa Fe, Dallas, Los Angeles, Australia, and Europe. Martin has had solo exhibitions at Guild Hall, East Hampton, NY and Islip Art Museum, Islip, NY. Her work can also be found in the permanent collection of the Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY; Guild Hall, East Hampton, NY; and in numerous corporate and private collections throughout the world.


The Break 3, 2018, dye sublimation on aluminum, 24 x 56 in, edition of 17 (12 available)

The Break 3, 2018, dye sublimation on aluminum, 24 x 56 in, edition of 17 (12 available)

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


JANE MARTIN speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ WHAT MEDIUMS DO YOU WORK IN?

JM/ When something calls to me, however undefined it may be at the inception, it seems to speak in the language of a particular medium. So by nature I am a multi-disciplinary artist, currently working primarily in photography and video. Each medium informs and enriches the other as their subjects refer to both the primal power and quieter mysteries of nature.

CM/ WHAT DRAWS YOU TO PHOTOGRAPHY AS A MEDIUM?

JM/ Photography is an act of intimacy. It often allows us to see what we are incapable of observing in the movement of life. The wave images were shot post-hurricane with a 300mm lens – stepping way beyond the danger zone ropes, standing in the raging sea. The format that feels most potent to me is a long horizontal, a 2.4:1 ratio called Anamorphic, that echoes cinematic widescreen. I crop my images according to this ratio, allowing the ocean ‘riffs’ to fill the screen.

CM/ WATER IS A MAIN THEME IN YOUR WORK. WHY?

JM/ Water has become one of the primary subjects of my photographs, whether the primal force of the ocean—the enormous surf of the East End—or the stillness of lakes on the easternmost point of Australia. Water also comes to a perfect stillness as reflected in my more abstract series, shot above tea tree lakes, ‘Down Under,’ once aboriginal birthing grounds. Full of depth and mystery, we find the extraordinary in the ordinary. 

CM/ WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE EAST END?

JM/I first came to the East End in 1998 looking for a weekend respite from New York City. I immediately fell in love with the diversity of waterscapes and its more rural areas combined with the level of cultural sophistication.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

CHRISTINE MATTHÄI

Matthäi’s photographs, with their aura of sensuality and spirituality, are also quite stylish, sometimes even glamorous.
— Coco Myers

“I use photography as a tool to express my feelings and impressions. The original photographic images are digitally transformed so that colors and shapes turn into abstractions of the source image.

My intention is to convey the feeling of losing oneself in space with no sense of time and place, which is similar to the practice of meditation. I often work with multiple layers to achieve the final image, which emerges from my subconscious.

My favorite subject has been water, a fascination that resulted in my Light and Sea series. This work consists of abstract visual meditations on the interplay of air, light and water, the shifting of colors and shapes from form to formlessness. In Light Meditations, the brushing light lines on the water’s surface turn into visual rhythms, repetitive strolls on lines and dots.

With Musings on Words and Poetry, I incorporate repetitions of words and sentences from poetry and letters. The images pay homage to the vanishing word as a carrier of thought. The form of the square represents the four elements of fire, water, air and earth. I use the square as a sacred place to hold multiple layers of writings precious to me. The visual effects are similar to ancient hieroglyphs—an expression of my desire for timelessness and preservation.” — CM


German-born Christine Matthäi’s fascination with photography and film began during her early teens. She graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology in Berlin, then moved to New York City in the mid-eighties, where she started as a photographer’s assistant. Later, she worked as a photojournalist and foreign correspondent for international magazines and newspapers.

Matthäi’s strong connections to the New York art scene stimulated and helped contribute to the exploration of her own artistic creativity. Over a decade ago, she decided to pursue her art photography full time. She moved to the East End in 1992 and now divides her time between Shelter Island and the Bahamas.

Matthäi’s work has appeared in shows at the Alex Ferrone Gallery, Cutchogue, NY; the Watermill Museum, Watermill, NY; folioeast, East Hampton, NY; Monika Olko Gallery and Tullla Booth Gallery, Sag Harbor, NY: ARC Fine Art, Fairfield, CT; ArtHamptons; Grand Gallery, Grand Bahama; Majestic Hotel, Dubai; Amarillo Gallery, Bologna, Italy; and Galerie Melior, Straubing, Germany, among others.


Essence, 2018, photograph on plexiglass, 40 x 40 in, edition of 10 (9 available)

Essence, 2018, photograph on plexiglass, 40 x 40 in, edition of 10 (9 available)

PORTFOLIO

current & recently sold work


CHRISTINE MATTHÄI speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY SPECIAL OR UNUSUAL TECHNIQUES THAT YOU USE IN YOUR ART?

MATTHÄI/ I use photography as a primary tool. The original photographic images are then digitally transformed so that colors and shapes turn into abstractions of the source image. The images are either produced on plexiglass or as prints on paper which then serve as a canvas to be painted upon. For my newest series, Sand-gold Mandalas, I am mostly using sand and gold colors on paper.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

MATTHÄI/ My work is inspired by nature and stillness, by the extraordinary light conditions of sea, sky and water on the East end of Long Island. These conditions are reflected in my Light and Sea, Sacred Path and Architecture of Sound series.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK? IN A STUDIO SPACE, OUTSIDE?

MATTHÄI/ I can work anywhere when I feel inspired. My house in Shelter Island serves as my summer studio. My latest Sand and Gold Mandala art works were initially started on several Bahamas and Florida beaches where I let the natural forces of wind and sun form sand patterns for my photographic images which I later painted on with sand and gold color.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

MATTHÄI/ I have works of several fellow artists from Shelter Island and I hope to eventually exchange art with my friend and sculptor Hans van de Bovenkamp.

CM/ ANYTHING ELSE YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE ABOUT YOUR WORK?

MATTHÄI/ I work in series and each series is a continuation of the previous one. They are all connected though my inner quest of seeking the core of our existence.


LESLEY OBROCK

Obrock’s monotypes have color, character and charm. They feel personal—as if the abstract shapes have a life of their own.
— Coco Myers

“Very simply, I am inspired to make art because I love colors, shapes and textures.

I often start a piece with only a vague intention of composition and color and then let spontaneity and intuition take over. While I sometimes produce work that is representative, I am most moved to paint abstracted landscapes. I enjoy working with materials that have a tactile sensibility and believe in constantly challenging myself with new techniques, concepts and subject matter.” — LO


Lesley Obrock grew up in the Midwest. Her formative childhood experiences, working alongside her seamstress grandmother amidst piles of fabrics and trims, had a profound impact that sparked a lifelong interest in texture, color and pattern.

Obrock studied painting and printmaking at Meramec Community College in St. Louis, MO and obtained a degree in interior design. She went on to open a private gardening business in St. Louis, which she ran for 18 years. She moved to the east end of Long Island in 2008 and returned full-time to making art in a variety of media—primarily printmaking, encaustic, watercolor and acrylic.

A member of the Artist Alliance of East Hampton, East End Arts and Springs Improvement Society, O’Brock has participated in numerous curated and juried shows, including two curated shows at the Islip Art Museum, Islip, NY, and the 2016, 2017 and 2018 Springs Invitational in East Hampton, NY, the Watermill Center, Watermill, NY, and in several folioeast shows in East Hampton. Her work can be found in private collections across the country.


Yellow Green Sky Silhouette, 2019, monoprint, 14 x 14 in (framed)

Yellow Green Sky Silhouette, 2019, monoprint, 14 x 14 in (framed)

ARTIST'S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold work


LESLEY OBROCK speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ Can you describe the mediums you work in and your process?

LO/ I primarily make monoprints or small editions of varied prints. I usually start with quick sketches, a general idea of composition and color and then just dive right in. Often I'll end up with something completely different, but that is the nature and beauty of monoprints.

With encaustic I use a mixture of beeswax, damar resin and pigment. It produces a wonderful wax paint that when applied to a substrate has a beautiful texture and luminosity. The materials and studio setup can be tricky. You need to have the wax in a liquid state while applying it to a substrate, then gently reheat it so it adheres to all the wax layers below. This is done with a torch or heat gun and you have to have excellent ventilation.

CM/ HOW DOES THIS AREA INFLUENCE OR INFILTRATE YOUR WORK?

LO/ The beauty of simple things. Sunsets, the way something has weathered from the ocean, there are a lot of things like that. Also, I've made some wonderful friends here.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WORK?

LO/ I have a dedicated studio space with a printing press and encaustic setup that includes a hot palette for heating the colored waxes, scraping and incising tools, blow torch, a full range of brushes and a specially designed ventilation system.

CM/ ANYTHING ELSE YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE ABOUT YOUR WORK?

LO/ Any day I'm making art is a good day.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

BETH O'DONNELL

O’Donnell’s floral photographs are lush and gorgeous; her mixed-media works are creative, complex, and intriguing.
— Coco Myers

“For my encaustic works, I create textured paintings on a customized and oversized heated plate to blend abstracted imagery of the real world. The place, the feeling, or experience that I am portraying is a snapshot of my present mindfulness; the size of the work comes from the same inspirational process. I hope the resulting images, whether beach or urban scenes, challenge the viewer to look again at what passes in front of them. I attempt to offer calming, reassuring works as symbols of hope in our ever-changing world.

As a photographer who also has a love of painting, I have created what feels to me to be a natural hybrid of these two interests in my mixed media works. The process often starts with mounting photographs on birch panel. I then cover the images with layers of encaustic wax and paint using pigmented oil sticks and inks.

I also enjoy shooting florals with my macro lens, creating almost abstract portraits of flowers. I get taken away in a meditative way when shooting this way; usually still shooting them with my film camera to get what I’m looking for.” — BO


Beth O’Donnell was born in Evanston, Illinois. In the late nineties she studied photography, first at the Evanston Art Center, then at the International Center for Photography in New York City. In 2002, she spent twenty months in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya, doing photojournalistic work that was published in The London Daily Telegraph and Marie Claire.

In 2005, O’Donnell began combining photography with encaustic wax. Most recently, she has been using encaustic wax and pigmented oil sticks to add texture to an array of papers and panels in order to create ethereal geometric forms and abstract landscapes.

O’Donnell’s work has been shown in many exhibitions, including at Ashawagh Hall, Amagansett, NY; The Art Barn at Larkin Pond, folioeast, and Guild Hall, East Hampton, NY; The White Room Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY; Holly Hunt, Birnam Wood Gallery, Urban Zen, African Rainforest Conservancy, New York, NY; Heiberg Cummings Design, Oslo, Norway; and The Home Gallery, Nairobi, Kenya.

O'Donnell has also exhibited work at the United Nations in conjunction with the Istanbul +5 Conference and her photographs have been auctioned at several major philanthropic events around the United States. Her book, Angels in Africa, published by Vendome Press in 2006, was named by The Guardian (UK) as one of the top ten photography books of that year.


O’Donnell in her studio

O’Donnell in her studio

ARTIST’S CAROUSEL

rotating exhibit of current & recently sold photography


BETH O’DONNELL speaks to folioeast’s COCO MYERS

CM/ YOU WORK IN A VARIETY OF MEDIUMS. HOW DO YOU COMBINE THEM?

BO/ I almost always use encaustic wax and oil paint; oil sticks either to make a painting on board or to be used over photography. I melt wax in electric pans or on a large "hot box." I use a heat gun to reheat or move the wax. I also use Japanese rice paper and tissue paper as the ground for encaustic wax paintings. Recently with photography, I've been tearing the photograph, sewing it back together and then applying the clear wax before using brushes and oil paint to finish the work.

CM/ WHERE DO YOU DO MOST OF YOUR WORK?

BO/ I built a modular barn in East Hampton which is my studio. The space has a loft for an office/resting area and downstairs is the work space. I travel quite a bit and guide safaris, so I also shoot a lot in Africa.

CM/ WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF YEAR ON THE EAST END? IS IT ALSO A PARTICULARLY CREATIVE TIME FOR YOU?

BO/ Summer is my favorite season. I know it's crowded but I take the back roads and I'm up early. It is the most creative time for me continuing into fall. I like to open up my studio door and bring the work outside.

CM/ DO YOU HAVE ANY WORKS BY EAST END ARTISTS IN YOUR HOME?

BO/ I have two Peter Beard photographs depicting Africa and I also have a large John Alexander painting.


PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW of photography